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Baseline egg load of southern pine beetle parasitoid complex

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2012

Sherah L. VanLaerhoven
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States 72701
Tanya L. Hanano
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States 72701
Fred M. Stephen
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States 72701
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Egg load of newly emerged adult parasitoids of the southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), was examined. Infested bark was collected from D. frontalis infestations in southwestern Arkansas (Clark and Montgomery counties; 1995), the Bankhead National Forest in Alabama (1999), and the Talladega National Forest in Alabama (1998–2000) between June and September of each collection year. Newly emerged parasitoid females were dissected and numbers of mature and immature eggs counted. There was no significant difference in number of eggs within a species and between parasitoids from the Bankhead National Forest compared with those from the Talladega National Forest in Alabama in 1999. There were differences in number of eggs within a species between years at the same location. Dendroctonus frontalis parasitoids in the family Pteromalidae (Hymenoptera) had the most mature eggs, followed by Braconidae (Hymenoptera) and Eurytomidae (Hymenoptera). Within the D. frontalis parasitoids in the family Pteromalidae, Dinotiscus dendroctoni (Ashmead) and Heydenia unica Cook and Davis had more mature eggs than did Roptrocerus xylophagorum Ratzeburg. Within the D. frontalis parasitoids in the family Braconidae, Meteorus hypophloei Cushman females contained the most mature eggs, followed by Dendrosoter sulcatus Muesebeck, Spathius pallidus Ashmead, and Coeloides pissodis (Ashmead). These data constitute a foundation for defining baseline egg load of the D. frontalis parasitoid complex.

Résumé

Nous avons examiné la quantité d’oeufs présents chez des parasitoïdes adultes fraîchement émergés du dendroctone méridional du pin, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann (Coleoptera : Scolytidae). De l’écorce a été récoltée sur des pins dans des forêts infestées par D. frontalis dans le sud-ouest de l’Arkansas (comtés de Clark et de Montgomery; 1995) et dans les forêts nationales de Bankhead (1999) et de Talladega (1998–2000) en Alabama, entre juin et septembre, chaque année de récolte. Les femelles parasitoïdes fraîchement émergées ont été disséquées et on y a dénombré les oeufs immatures et les oeufs à maturité. Il n’y avait pas de différence significative entre le nombre d’oeufs des parasitoïdes d’une espèce dans la forêt de Bankhead et celui des parasitoïdes de la même espèce dans la forêt de Talladega en Alabama en 1999. Il y avait des différences dans le nombre d’oeufs d’une espèce d’une année à l’autre au même endroit. Ce sont les parasitoïdes de D. frontalis de la famille des Pteromalidae (Hymenoptera) qui contenaient le plus grand nombre d’oeufs arrivés à maturité, suivis des Braconidae (Hymenoptera) et des Eurytomidae (Hymenoptera). Parmi les parasitoïdes de D. frontalis de la famille des Pteromalidae, Dinosticus dendroctoni (Ashmead) et Heydenia unica Cook et Davis avaient plus d’oeufs matures que Roptrocerus xylophagorum Ratzeburg. Chez ceux de la famille des Braconidae, les femelles de Meteorus hypophloei Cushman contenaient le plus grand nombre d’oeufs avancés, suivis de Dendrosoter sulcatus Muesebeck, de Spathius pallidus Ashmead et de Coeloides pissodis (Ashmead). Ce sont là des données de base pour des études sur le nombre-type d’oeufs chez les espèces du complexe de parasitoïdes de D. frontalis.

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Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 2002

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