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3-Methylcyclohex-2-en-1-one and the Douglas-fir beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae): history of successful bark beetle pheromone treatments

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 November 2020

Darrell W. Ross
Affiliation:
Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society, College of Forestry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, 97331, United States of America
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

This paper reviews the literature on the identification of 3-methylcyclohex-2-en-1-one (MCH) as the antiaggregation pheromone of the Douglas-fir beetle (Dendroctonus pseudotsugae Hopkins) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and the development of successful management applications using the pheromone. Previously unpublished data from two studies on novel uses of MCH are included. The successful development of antiaggregation pheromone-based treatments for the Douglas-fir beetle is discussed in relation to efforts to develop similar treatments for other bark beetle species, and opportunities for future research on MCH and the Douglas-fir beetle are suggested.

Type
Research Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of Canada

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Footnotes

Present address: Department of Entomology, School of Natural Resource Sciences, College of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Natural Resources, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota, 58108, United States of America.

Subject editor: Therese M. Poland

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