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Shawn L. Berman is a Professor of Business and Society at the University of New Mexico’s Anderson School of Management, where he serves as Associate Dean. He received his Ph.D. in Strategic Management from the University of Washington. Before coming to Anderson he served on the faculties at Boston University and Santa Clara University, where he was a fellow to the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics. He has three main research interests: Stakeholder Theory, especially measurement issues; the evolution the employee-employer relationship; and issues of corporate governance. Shawn has also recently become interested in how managerial discretion impacts firm-stakeholder relationships. His work has appeared in The Academy of Management Journal, The Academy of Management Review, Business Ethics Quarterly, and Business & Society, as well as other outlets. Shawn’s most recent publication, with Natalia Vidal and Harry Van Buren, “Stakeholder Theory and Value Creation Models in Brazilian Firms,” appears in Brazilian Review of Business Management. Shawn is on the editorial board of Business & Society and Business Ethics Quarterly. Shawn has served as Division Chair for the Social Issues in Management Division of the Academy of Management, as well as program chair and professional development workshop chair. He currently serves as the Co-Chair for the SIM Doctoral Consortium.

Harry J. Van Buren III (Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh) a Professor of Business & Society at the University of New Mexico’s Anderson School of Management, where he holds the Jack and Donna Rust Professorship in Business Ethics. His current research interests include the ethical implications of contemporary employment practices, fairness in organization-stakeholder relationships, the intersection of religious beliefs and beliefs about business ethics, and business respect for human rights in developing countries. He has published in a variety of outlets, including Academy of Management Review, Business & Society, Business Ethics Quarterly, Business and Society Review, Human Resource Management, Human Resource Management Review, and the Journal of Business Ethics. He is an associate editor for Business & Society (where he is co-editing a special issue on religion as a macro-social force affecting business), the Human Resource Management section editor for the Journal of Business Ethics, and previously he co-edited a special issue of the Journal of Management Studies on accounting for stakeholders. He has served as division chair, program chair, and professional development program chair for the Social Issues in Management Division of the Academy of Management.

Claus Dierksmeier is the Director of the “Weltethos-Institut” and Professor for Globalization and Business Ethics at the University of Tübingen in Germany. He previously worked as Distinguished Professor of Globalization Ethics and as Co-Director of the Sustainable Management and Measurement Institute (SUMMIT) at Stonehill College, Easton/Boston, USA. His areas of expertise and academic work include political, economic, and religious philosophy with a particular focus on the theories of freedom and responsibility in the age of globalism. Prof. Dr. Claus Dierksmeier also is Academic Director of the Humanistic Management Center.

Ignacio Ferrero is Professor of Business Ethics and the Dean of the School of Economics and Business Administration at the University of Navarra. He has been Visiting Scholar at Bentley University in 2010, 2011, 2015; at Harvard University 2011 and at NotreDame University (Mendoza College of Business) in 2012. He has published several books on the History of Economic Thought and articles in academic journals such as Business Ethics Quarterly; Journal of Business Ethics; Business Ethics: A European Review; Business and Society Review. He is currently working on virtue ethics, and the common good in finance. He holds a BS in Philosophy and in Business Administration (University of Navarra), and a Ph.D. in Economics (University of Navarra). E-mail:

Kenneth Goodpaster earned his A.B. in mathematics from the University of Notre Dame and his Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Michigan. He taught philosophy at Notre Dame during the 1970s before joining the Harvard Business School faculty in 1980. In 1990, Goodpaster accepted the David and Barbara Koch Endowed Chair in Business Ethics at the University of St. Thomas (UST) in Minnesota. His book Conscience and Corporate Culture (Wiley-Blackwell, 2007) received generous praise from reviewers. He contributed to Vocation of the Business Leader, issued by the Vatican’s Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace (2012) and Respect in Action: Applying Subsidiarity in Business (UST Center for Catholic Studies, 2015). Goodpaster is an Associate Editor of Business Ethics Quarterly and served as Executive Editor of Corporate Responsibility: The American Experience (Cambridge University Press, 2012) which received the 2014 Academy of Management Best Book Award. In 2014, he was named to Ethisphere Magazine’s list of the 100 Most Influential People in Business Ethics—and was honored by the Society for Business Ethics for a “Career of Outstanding Scholarly Achievement in the Field of Business Ethics.” He is now Professor Emeritus in the UST Opus College of Business.

Gregorio Guitián is Assistant Professor of Moral Theology at the School of Theology of the University of Navarra. He holds a degree in Business Administration (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid) and a doctorate in Theology (Pontificia Università della Santa Croce). His research field is Catholic Social Teaching on economic issues. He has published several books on business and Catholic Social Teaching and articles in academic journals on Theology, as well as in Business Ethics Quarterly, Journal of Business Ethics and Journal of Markets & Morality. He was Visiting Scholar at the Catholic University of America in 2013. He is associate editor of the journal Scripta Theologica. E-mail:

Kendy M. Hess is the Brake Smith Associate Professor of Social Philosophy and Ethics at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts. She has a J.D. from Harvard Law School, an M.A. from Northwestern University, and a Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Colorado. She practiced corporate environmental law for fifteen years before moving to philosophy, and her current research focuses on the moral agency and obligations of corporations and other highly organized groups.

Jessica A. Kennedy is an Assistant Professor of Management at Vanderbilt University’s Owen Graduate School of Management. Her research examines ethical behavior, power and status, and gender in organizations. She holds a Ph.D. from the Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley. E-mail:

Tae Wan Kim is an Assistant Professor of Ethics in the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University. Three main themes of his work are a Confucian perspective on business ethics, the ethics of new technologies and the relationship between ethics and management research. He has published in Business Ethics Quarterly and Journal of Business Ethics. E-mail: .

Hasko von Kriegstein is Assistant Professor in the Law and Business Department at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management. He holds a Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Toronto, and a B.A. in philosophy and economics from Universität Bayreuth. His main research interests are in normative ethical theory and business ethics.

Daniel Layman is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Davidson College. His current research focuses on political theory, especially the character of political liberty and its implications for markets and distributive justice. He was previously a post-doctoral fellow in the Political Theory Project at Brown University and received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Justine Nolan is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of New South Wales Australia and Deputy Director of the Australian Human Rights Centre. She is a Visiting Scholar at the NYU Stern Center for Business and Human Rights. She is a co-editor of the recent book Business and Human Rights: From Principles to Practice. Prior to her appointment at UNSW in 2004 she was the Director of the Business and Human Rights Program at the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights (now Human Rights First) in the US. She is an editor of the Australian Journal of Human Rights and the Business and Human Rights Journal.

Alan Rubel is Assistant Professor in the School of Library and Information Studies and an affiliate of the Law School at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His current research concerns the nature and value of privacy, moral issues surrounding public health surveillance, rights to intellectual freedom, and theoretical foundations of the criminal law. He was previously a Greenwall Fellow in Bioethics and Health Policy at Johns Hopkins and Georgetown Universities and has served as a senior advisor to the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues. Professor Rubel received his J.D. and Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Alejo José G. Sison is a philosopher who teaches Business Ethics at the School of Economics and Business Administration at the University of Navarra. His research deals with issues at the juncture of ethics, the economy and politics, examined from the perspective of the virtues and the common good. His latest works include Happiness and Virtue Ethics in Business (Cambridge University Press, 2015) and the Handbook of Virtue Ethics in Business and Management (Springer, 2016), of which he is editor in chief. E-mail:

Alan Strudler is Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, where he serves as the coordinator of his department’s doctoral program. His current research agenda includes work on the nature of the firm and on the idea of honesty in business transactions. E-mail: .

Michelle K. Westermann-Behaylo (J.D. Vanderbilt University; Ph.D. George Washington University) is an Assistant Professor of International Management at the Amsterdam Business School, University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands. She has a background in international trade law, strategic management and public policy. Before her academic career, she gained over ten years of industry experience serving as an international trade attorney for the United States Departments of Justice and Commerce, as well as an international trade banker for Dutch merchant bank MeesPierson. Dr. Westermann-Behaylo’s research generally focuses on how organizations use market and non-market strategies in various international social, legal, and public policy contexts. She considers how firms manage stakeholder relationships for both strategic and social performance. She also writes about the role of business in promoting peace, human dignity, and human rights. Her work has been published in such journals as Strategic Organization, Academy of Management Perspectives, Business & Society, American Business Law Journal, and Journal of Business Ethics. Her research has received financial support from, among others, the Aspen Institute, the Institute for Economics and Peace, and the One Earth Future Foundation.