Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78dcdb465f-vddjc Total loading time: 14.145 Render date: 2021-04-15T10:47:03.782Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Some Factors affecting the Availability of Contact Insecticides

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 July 2009

F. Barlow
Affiliation:
Colonial Insecticide Reasearch Unit, Porton.
A. B. Hadaway
Affiliation:
Colonial Insecticide Reasearch Unit, Porton.

Extract

The physical state of deposits from various formulations of insecticides applied to different materials is considered in relation to the availability of the insecticide to insects making contact with the surface of the treated material.

Applications of oil solutions of insecticides to absorptive material result in absorption of the solution, and the insecticide is thereby rendered ineffective. On a nonabsorptive surface, oil solutions are the most efficient formulations, but only so long as the deposit remains wholly or partly liquid; if evaporation of the solvent gives a dry crystalline residue, this is much less efficient than the original solution.

On some fibrous absorptive surfaces, a solution of DDT in oil remains in a supersaturated condition in and around the fibres. If crystallisation is stimulated by mechanical means, the resulting crystals project from the treated surface and it is suggested that, in these circumstances, crystals are more readily available to insects than the oil solution from which they were derived.

DDT on compressed wall board shows the induced crystallisation to a greater degree than other insecticides. It is concluded, therefore, that wall board and similar surfaces should not be used in comparing the potencies of chlorinatedhydrocarbon insecticides applied as oil solutions, as DDT would be more available than others. Some factors that affect the degree of induced crystallisation are mentioned.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1952

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Barlow, F. & Hadaway, A. B. (1952). Bull. ent. Res., 42, pp. 769777.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Block, S. S. (1948). Soap & sanit. Chem., 24, no. 2 pp. 138141, 171; no. 3 pp. 151, 153; no. 4 pp. 155, 157, 159, 161, 207, 213.Google Scholar
Bruce, W. N. (1949). Bull. Ill. nat. Hist. Surv., 25, pp. 132.Google Scholar
Elmendorf, J. E. jr., & others. (1946). Amer. J. trop. Med., 26, pp. 663685.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hadaway, A. B. & Barlow, F. (1949). Bull. ent. Res., 40, pp. 323343.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hadaway, A. B. & Barlow, F. (1951). Bull. ent. Res., 41, pp. 603622CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kruse, C. W. (1948). Soap & sanit. Chem., 24, no. 11 pp. 131, 133, 135, 137, 139, 169.Google Scholar
Linsquist, A. W., Jones, H. A. & Madden, A. H. (1946). J. econ. Ent., 39, pp. 5559.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lord, K. A. (1950). Ann. appl. Biol., 37, pp.123126.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McCauley, R. H. jr., Fay, R. W. & Simmons, S. W. (1948). J. nat. Malar. Soc., 7, pp. 294299.Google Scholar
Musgrave, A. J. (1948). Nature, 162, p. 296.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Parkin, E. A. & Green, A. A. (1947). Bull. ent. Res., 38, pp. 311325.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vickers, L. G. (1947). 77th Rep. ent. Soc. Ont. 1946, pp. 1920.Google Scholar
Wigglesworth, V. B. (1942). Bull. ent. Res., 33, pp. 205218.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 3 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 15th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Some Factors affecting the Availability of Contact Insecticides
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Some Factors affecting the Availability of Contact Insecticides
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Some Factors affecting the Availability of Contact Insecticides
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *