Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78dcdb465f-f64jw Total loading time: 0.299 Render date: 2021-04-19T01:40:27.473Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Similar worldwide patterns in the sex pheromone signal and response in the oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 September 2014

A.L. Knight
Affiliation:
USDA, ARS, Yakima Agricultural Research Laboratory, Wapato, WA 98951, USA
W. Barros-Parada
Affiliation:
Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, Universidad de Talca, Casilla 747, Talca, Chile Millennium Nucleus in Molecular Ecology and Evolutionary Applications of Agroecosystems, Universidad de Talca, Casilla 747, Talca, Chile
D. Bosch
Affiliation:
UdL-IRTA, Av. Alcalde Rovira Roure 191, 25198 Lleida, Spain
L.A. Escudero-Colomar
Affiliation:
IRTA, Estació Experimental Mas Badia, 17134 La Tallada d'Empordà, Girona, Spain
E. Fuentes-Contreras
Affiliation:
Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, Universidad de Talca, Casilla 747, Talca, Chile Millennium Nucleus in Molecular Ecology and Evolutionary Applications of Agroecosystems, Universidad de Talca, Casilla 747, Talca, Chile
J. Hernández-Sánchez
Affiliation:
IHBI, Queensland University of Technology, 60 Musk Ave/cnr. Blamey St, Kelvin Grove, QLD, 4059, Australia
C. Yung
Affiliation:
Department of Bioresource Sciences, Andong National University, Andong 760-749, Republic of Korea
Y. Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Bioresource Sciences, Andong National University, Andong 760-749, Republic of Korea
O.B. Kovanci
Affiliation:
Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Plant Protection, Uludag University, Gorukle Kampusu 16059 Bursa, Turkey
A. Levi
Affiliation:
Department of Crop and Forest Sciences, University of Lleida, Av. Alcalde Rovira Roure 191, 25198 Lleida, Spain
P. Lo
Affiliation:
Plant and Food Research, Hawkes Bay, 4157 Havelock North, New Zealand
F. Molinari
Affiliation:
Entomology and Plant Pathology Institute, Catholic University of Sacro Cuore, Via Emilia Parmense 84, 29100 Piacenza, Italy
J. Valls
Affiliation:
Biostatistics Unit. Institut de Recerca Biomèdica de Lleida (IRBLLEIDA), Hospital Universitari Arnau de Vilanova de Lleida (HUAV), C/ Rovira Roure 80, 25198 Lleida, Spain
C. Gemeno
Affiliation:
Department of Crop and Forest Sciences, University of Lleida, Av. Alcalde Rovira Roure 191, 25198 Lleida, Spain
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The response of Grapholita molesta (Busck) males to three-component sex pheromone blends containing a 100% ratio of the major sex pheromone component, (Z)-8-dodecenyl acetate and a 10% ratio of (Z)-8-dodecenol, but with varying ratios of (E)-8-dodecenyl acetate (0.4, 5.4, 10.4, 30.4, and 100.1% E-blends) was tested with populations in eight stone and pome fruit orchards in Europe, Asia, and North and South America. Traps baited with the 5.4% E-blend caught significantly more males than traps with any other blend with all populations. Significantly more males were caught in traps baited with the 10.4% E-blend than in traps with the remaining blends, except with the 0.4% E-blend in Turkey. Significant differences in male moth catches occurred between the other blends with the 0.4>30.4% E-blend, and the 30.4>100.1% E-blend. Male moth catches with the 100.1% E-blend only differed from the hexane control in Chile. No apparent differences were noted to these blends in populations collected from pome or stone fruits. Flight tunnel assays to synthetic blends with a subset of populations were similar to the field results, but the breadth of the most attractive E-blends was wider. Flight tunnel assays also demonstrated a high level of male–female cross-attraction among field-collected populations. Female gland extracts from field-collected populations did not show any significant variation in their three-component blends. The only exceptions in these assays were that long-term laboratory populations were less responsive and attractive, and produced different blend ratios of the two minor components than recently collected field populations.

Type
Research Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Agrian. (2014) Agrian label center [www document]. URL http://www.agrian.com/labelcenter/results.cfm Google Scholar
Bailey, P. (1979) An attempt to control Oriental fruit moth, Cydia molesta Busck by mass releases of Macrocentrus ancylivorus Rohwer (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). Australian Journal of Entomology 18, 211212.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baker, T.C. & Cardé, R.T. (1979) Analysis of pheromone-mediated behaviors in male Grapholita molesta, the oriental fruit moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). Environmental Entomology 8, 956968.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baker, T.C., Cardé, R.T. & Miller, J.R. (1980) Oriental fruit moth pheromone component emission rates measured after collection by glass-surface adsorption. Journal of Chemical Ecology 6, 749758.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baker, T.C., Meyer, W. & Roelofs, W.L. (1981) Sex pheromone dosage and blend specificity of response by oriental fruit moth males. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 30, 269279.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bellerose, S., Chouinard, G. & Roy, M. (2007) Occurrence of Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in major apple-growing areas of southern Quebec. Canadian Entomologist 139, 292295.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Beroza, M., Gentry, C.R., Blythe, J.L. & Muschik, G.M. (1973) Isomer content and other factors influencing captures of oriental fruit moth by synthetic pheromone traps. Journal of Economic Entomology 66, 13071311.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blomefield, T.L. & Geertsema, H. (1990) First record of the oriental fruit moth, Cydia molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae: Olethreutinae), a serious pest of peaches, in South Africa. Phytophylactica 22, 355357.Google Scholar
Boller, E. (1972) Behavioral aspects of mass-rearing of insects. Entomophaga 17, 925.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cardé, R.T. & Haynes, K.F. (2004) Structure of the pheromone communication channel in moths pp. 283332 in Cardé, R.T., , R.T. & Millar, J.G. (Eds) Advances in Insect Chemical Ecology. London, Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0 521 79275 4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cardé, R.T. & Minks, A.K. (1995) Control of moth pests by mating disruption: successes and constraints. Annual Review of Entomology 40, 559585.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cardé, R.T., Baker, T.C. & Roelofs, W.L. (1975) Ethological function of components of a sex attractant system for oriental fruit moth males, Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). Journal of Chemical Ecology 1, 475491.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cardé, A.M., Baker, T.C. & Cardé, R.T. (1979) Identification of a four-component sex pheromone of the female oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). Journal of Chemical Ecology 5, 423427.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Du, Y., Li, P., Chen, Z., Lin, Y., Wang, Y. & Qin, Y. (2013) Field trapping of male Phyllonorycter ringoniella using variable ratios of pheromone components. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 146, 357363.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ellis, N.H. & Hull, L.A. (2012) Factors influencing adult Grapholita molesta dispersal in commercial Malus and Prunus host crops. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 146, 232241.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
El-Sayed, A.M. & Trimble, R.M. (2002) Relative attractiveness of natural and synthetic pheromone of three tortricid tree fruit pests. Environmental Entomology 31, 960964.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
El-Sayed, A.M., Delisle, J., DeLury, N., Gut, L.J., Judd, G.J.R., Legrand, S., Reissig, W.H., Roelofs, W.L., Unelius, C.R. & Trimble, R.M. (2003) Geographic variation in pheromone chemistry, antennal electrophysiology, and pheromone-mediated trap catch of North American populations of the obliquebanded leafroller. Environmental Entomology 32, 470476.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
González, R.H. (1980) La Grafolita, una nueva polilla de la manzana en Curico. Revista Frutícola 1, 79.Google Scholar
Guerin, P.M., Arn, H., Buser, H.R., Charmillot, P., Toth, M. & Sziraki, G. (1986) Sex pheromone of Grapholita funebrana occurrence of Z-8 and Z-10-tetradecenyl acetate as secondary components. Journal of Chemical Ecology 12, 13611368.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Han, K.S., Jung, J.K., Choi, K.H., Lee, S.W. & Boo, K.S. (2001) Sex pheromone composition and male trapping of the oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in Korea. Journal of Asia-Pacific Entomology 4, 3135.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haynes, K.F. & Baker, T.C. (1988). Potential for evolution of resistance to pheromones: Worldwide and local variation in chemical communication system of pink bollworm moth, Pectinophora gossypiella . Journal of Chemical Ecology 14, 15471560.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Haynes, K.F. & Hunt, R.E. (1990). Interpopulational variation in emitted pheromone blend of cabbage looper moth, Trichoplusia ni . Journal of Chemical Ecology 16, 509519.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Horak, M. (1984) Assessment of taxonomically significant structures in the Tortricinae (Lep.: Tortricidae). Bulletin de la Societe Entomologique Suisse 57, 364.Google Scholar
Ivaldi-Sender, C. (1974) Techniques simples pour un élevage permanent de la tordeuse orientale, Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) sur milieu artificiel. Annales de Zoologie Ecologie Animale 6, 337343.Google Scholar
Kirk, H., Dorn, S. & Mazzi, D. (2013) Worldwide population genetic structure of the oriental fruit moth (Grapholita molesta), a globally invasive pest. BMC Ecology 13, 1222.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Komai, F. (1999) A taxonomic review of the genus Grapholita and allied genera (Lepidoptera : Tortricidae) in the Palaearctic region. Entomologica Scandinavica, Supplement 55. 226.Google Scholar
Lacey, M.J. & Sanders, C.J. (1992) Chemical composition of sex pheromone of oriental fruit moth and rates of release by individual female moths. Journal of Chemical Ecology 18, 14211435.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Leppik, E. & Frérot, B. (2012) Volatile organic compounds and host-plant specialization in European corn borer E and Z pheromone races. Chemoecology 22, 119129.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Linn, C. & Roelofs, W. (1991). The effects of different blend ratios and temperature on the active space of the oriental fruit moth sex pheromone. Physiological Entomology 16, 211222.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Linn, C.E. & Roelofs, W.L. (1981) Modification of sex pheromone discrimination in male oriental fruit moths by pre-exposure to (E)-8-dodecenyl acetate. Physiological Entomology 6, 421429.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Linn, C.E. & Roelofs, W.L. (1983) Effect of varying proportions of the alcohol components on sex pheromone blend discrimination in male oriental fruit moths. Physiological Entomology 8, 291306.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Löfstedt, C. (1990) Population variation and genetic control of pheromone communication systems in moths. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 54, 199218.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Löfstedt, C., Löfqvist, J., Lanne, B.S., Van Der Pers, J.N. & Hansson, B.S. (1986). Pheromone dialects in European turnip moths Agrotis segetum . Oikos 46, 250257.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Myers, C.T., Krawczyk, G. & Agnello, A.M. (2009) Response of tortricid moths and non-target insects to pheromone trap color in commercial apple orchards. Journal of Entomological Science 44, 6977.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nagy, B.A.L. & George, J.A. (1981) Differences in the numbers of sensilla trichodea between reared and wild adults of the oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). Proceedings Entomological Society of Ontario 112, 6772.Google Scholar
Persoons, C.J., Ritter, F.J. & Nooyes, W.J. (1977) Sex pheromone of the false codling moth Cryptophlebia leucotreta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) evidence for a two-component system. Journal of Chemical Ecology 3, 717722.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
R Development Core Team. (2008) R: A language and environment for statistical computing. R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria. ISBN 3-900051-07-0, available online at http://www.R-project.org.Google Scholar
Reis, W., Nora, I. & Melzer, R. (1988) Population dynamics of Grapholita molesta, Busk, and its adaptation on apple in South Brazil. Acta Horticulturae 232, 204208.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Roelofs, W.L. & Brown, R.L. (1982) Pheromones and evolutionary relationships of tortricids. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 13, 395422.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Roelofs, W.L. & Cardé, R.T. (1974) Oriental fruit moth and lesser appleworm attractant mixtures refined. Environmental Entomology 3, 586588.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rothschild, G.H.L. & Minks, A.K. (1977) Some factors influencing the performance of pheromone traps for oriental fruit moth in Australia. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 22, 171182.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rothschild, G.H.L. & Vickers, R.A. (1991) Biology, ecology and control of the oriental fruit moth. pp. 389412 in van der Geest, L.P.S. & Evenhuis, H.H. (Eds) Tortricid Pests: their Biology, Natural Enemies and Control. Elsevier, Amsterdam.Google Scholar
Rubio, M., Esteban, J. & Llamas, S. (1990) Otras especies capturadas en trampas de feromonas sexuales sintéticas de la polilla oriental del melocotonero Grapholita molesta Busck. Boletinal de Sanidad Vegetal. Plagas 16, 381389.Google Scholar
Russell, D.A. (1987) Parasitism of the oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae): the New Zealand position in a world perspective. New Zealand Entomologist 10, 1326.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smadja, C. & Butlin, R.K. (2009) On the scent of speciation: the chemosensory system and its role in premating isolation. Heredity 102, 7797.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Stelinski, L.L., McKenzie, D., Gut, L.J., Issacs, R. & Brunner, J. (2007) Comparison of female attractiveness and male response among populations of Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris) in western and eastern U.S. apple orchards. Environmental Entomology 36, 10321039.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tòth, M., Sziráki, G., Szöcs, G. & Sáringer, G. (1991) A pheromone inhibitor for male Grapholitha funebrana Tr., and its use for increasing the specificity of the lure for G. molesta Busck (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 35, 6572.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tòth, M., Löfstedt, C., Blair, B.W., Cabello, T., Farag, A.I., Hansson, B.S., Kovalev, B.G., Maini, S., Nesterov, E.A., Pajor, I., Sazonov, A.P., Shamshev, I.V., Subchev, M. & Szöcs, G. (1992) Attraction of male turnip moths Agrotis segetum (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) to sex pheromone components and their mixtures at 11 sites in Europe, Asia, and Africa. Journal of Chemical Ecology 18, 13371347.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Unbehend, M., Hänniger, S., Meagher, R.L., Heckel, D.G. & Groot, A.T. (2013) Pheromonal divergence between two strains of Spodoptera frugiperda . Journal of Chemical Ecology 39, 364376.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Varela, N., Avilla, J., Anton, S. & Gemeno, C. (2011) Synergism of pheromone and host-plant volatile blends in the attraction of Cydia molesta (Busck) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) males. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 141, 114122.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Witzgall, P., Kirsch, P. & Cork, A. (2010) Sex pheromones and their impact on pest management. Journal of Chemical Ecology 36, 80100.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wu, J., Wu, X., Chen, H., Xu, L., Liu, G., Mao, B., Quo, R. & Du, Y. (2012) Optimization of the sex pheromone of the rice leaf folder moth Cnaphalocrocis medinalis as a monitoring tool in China. Journal of Applied Entomology 137, 509518.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yang, C.Y., Jung, J.K., Han, K.S., Boo, K.S. & Yiem, M.S. (2002) Sex pheromone composition and monitoring of the oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in Naju pear orchards. Journal of Asia-Pacific Entomology 5, 201207.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zhao, Z.-G., Rong, E.-H., Li, S.-C., Zhang, L.-J., Kong, W.-N., Hu, R.-S., Zhang, J.-T. & Ma, R.-Y. (2013) Research on the practical parameters of sex pheromone traps for the oriental fruit moth. Pest Management Science 69, 11811186.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zheng, Y., Peng, X., Liu, G., Pan, H., Dorn, S. & Chen, M. (2013) High genetic diversity and structured populations of the oriental fruit moth in its range of origin. PLoS ONE 8(11), e78476. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0078476.Google Scholar

Knight Supplementary Material

Supplementary Data 1

PDF 131 KB

Knight Supplementary Material

Supplementary Data 2

PDF 270 KB

Knight Supplementary Material

Figure S1 and Tables S1-S9

PDF 188 KB

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 12
Total number of PDF views: 63 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 19th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Similar worldwide patterns in the sex pheromone signal and response in the oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Similar worldwide patterns in the sex pheromone signal and response in the oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Similar worldwide patterns in the sex pheromone signal and response in the oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *