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PCR–RFLP of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (subunit I) gene provides diagnostic markers for selected Diabrotica species (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

T.L. Clark
Affiliation:
Insect Genetics Laboratory, Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0816, USA
L.J. Meinke
Affiliation:
Insect Genetics Laboratory, Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0816, USA
J.E. Foster
Affiliation:
Insect Genetics Laboratory, Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0816, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Adult and larval identification of Diabrotica can be difficult. Some adult identifications require considerable taxonomic experience while larvae of many Diabroticaspecies are morphologically indistinguishable. This study was conducted to determine whether 12 pest and non-pest Diabrotica species could be separated using polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR–RFLP). A 1308 bp portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene (COI) was amplified using PCR and digested using several restriction endonucleases. Double digests of COI amplicons with AluI and MspI resolved on polyacrylamide gels revealed several diagnostic inter- and intraspecific polymorphisms. A key to the 12 species was constructed using the PCR–RFLP patterns.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2001

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PCR–RFLP of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (subunit I) gene provides diagnostic markers for selected Diabrotica species (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)
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PCR–RFLP of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (subunit I) gene provides diagnostic markers for selected Diabrotica species (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)
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