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Oviposition deterrents for the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) from fly faeces extracts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

J. Arredondo
Affiliation:
Campaña Nacional Contra Moscas de la Fruta, Desarrollo de Métodos, Central Poniente No. 14 Altos, Tapachula, Chiapas, CP 30700, México
F. Díaz-Fleischer
Affiliation:
Campaña Nacional Contra Moscas de la Fruta, Desarrollo de Métodos, Central Poniente No. 14 Altos, Tapachula, Chiapas, CP 30700, México LABIOTECA, Apartado Postal 250, Xalapa, Veracruz, CP 91090, Mexico
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

After oviposition, females of the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata Wiedemann deposit a host-marking pheromone on the fruit surface that deters oviposition by conspecifics. Methanolic extracts of fruit fly faeces elicit a similar deterrent effect. The results of laboratory and field experiments using raw methanolic extracts of C. capitata faeces as an oviposition deterrent are reported. Laboratory bioassays revealed a significant positive relationship between concentration of faeces and the inhibition of oviposition responses by C. capitata. Treatment of halves of coffee bushes with methanolic extracts containing 0.1, 1.0 and 10 mg faeces ml−1 resulted in a significant reduction of infestation only at the highest concentration (P = 0.03). Treatment of blocks of coffee bushes with an extract of 10 mg faeces ml−1 resulted in an 84%reduction in infestation by C. capitata in sprayed plants and a 56% reduction in adjacent untreated coffee bushes surrounding treated plots, probably due to the deterrent effect of host-marking pheromone on fly oviposition. We conclude that faeces contain oviposition deterrent substances that effectively reduce fruit infestations by C. capitata, suggesting a clear potential for the use of this infochemical in integrated management programmes targeted at this pest.

Type
Review Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2006

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