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Management and population dynamics of diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella): planting regimes, crop hygiene, biological control and timing of interventions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 June 2018


Z. Li
Affiliation:
Institute of Plant Protection, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China
M.J. Furlong
Affiliation:
School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia
T. Yonow
Affiliation:
CSIRO, GPO Box 1700, Canberra 2601, Australia
D.J. Kriticos
Affiliation:
CSIRO, GPO Box 1700, Canberra 2601, Australia
H. Bao
Affiliation:
Institute of Plant Protection, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China
F. Yin
Affiliation:
Institute of Plant Protection, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China
Q. Lin
Affiliation:
Institute of Plant Protection, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China
X. Feng
Affiliation:
Institute of Plant Protection, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China
M.P. Zalucki
Affiliation:
School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia
Corresponding

Abstract

Using an age-structured process-based simulation model for diamondback moth (DBM), we model the population dynamics of this major Brassica pest using the cropping practices and climate of Guangdong, China. The model simulates two interacting sub-populations (demes), each representing a short season crop. The simulated DBM abundance, and hence pest problems, depend on planting regime, crop hygiene and biological control. A continuous supply of hosts, a low proportion of crop harvested and long residue times between harvest and replanting each exacerbate pest levels. Biological control provided by a larval parasitoid can reduce pest problems, but not eliminate them when climate is suitable for DBM and under certain planting practices. The classic Integrated Pest Management (IPM) method of insecticide application, when pest threshold is reached, proved effective and halved the number of insecticide sprays when compared with the typical practice of weekly insecticide application.


Type
Research Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 

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