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Evidence for the presence of chemicals attractive to the banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in dead banana leaves

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

H. Braimah
Affiliation:
Department of Horticulture and Landscape, School of Plant Sciences, The University of Reading, Reading, RG6 6AS, UK Biological Control Division, Crops Research Institute, PO Box 3785, Kumasi, Ghana
H.F. van Emden*
Affiliation:
Department of Horticulture and Landscape, School of Plant Sciences, The University of Reading, Reading, RG6 6AS, UK
*
* Fax: 01189 352421 E-mail: h.f.vanemden@reading.ac.uk

Abstract

The effects of host and non-host plant odours on the foraging responses of the banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar), were investigated in the laboratory through arena and olfactometer bioassays. Contrary to previous reports that banana rhizome and pseudostem were the most attractive parts to the weevil, dead leaves were most preferred. Comparison of dead banana leaves with dead leaves of other plants showed that attractant odours were present in yam, cocoyam and dead grasses but absent in cocoa and soybean leaves. Complete leaf senescence while the leaf was attached to the mother plant proved necessary for the development of the dead-leaf-based odours but the involvement of microbial organisms could not be demonstrated. It is possible that dead-leaf-based attractants could be used in combination with microbials such as entomogenous fungi and nematodes in integrated management of C. sordidus.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1999

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