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Enantiomeric selectivity in behavioural and electrophysiological responses of Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 May 2011

J.I. Cook
Affiliation:
Centre for Sustainable Pest and Disease Management, Chemical Ecology Group, Biological Chemistry Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, AL5 2JQ, UK
S. Majeed
Affiliation:
Division of Chemical Ecology, Department of Plant Protection Biology, PO Box 102, Sundsvägen 14, SLU 230 53, Alnarp, Sweden
R. Ignell
Affiliation:
Division of Chemical Ecology, Department of Plant Protection Biology, PO Box 102, Sundsvägen 14, SLU 230 53, Alnarp, Sweden
J.A. Pickett
Affiliation:
Centre for Sustainable Pest and Disease Management, Chemical Ecology Group, Biological Chemistry Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, AL5 2JQ, UK
M.A. Birkett
Affiliation:
Centre for Sustainable Pest and Disease Management, Chemical Ecology Group, Biological Chemistry Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, AL5 2JQ, UK
J.G. Logan*
Affiliation:
Department of Disease Control, Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, WC1E 7HT, UK
*
*Author for correspondence Fax: +44 (0)207 927 2918 E-mail: james.logan@lshtm.ac.uk

Abstract

1-Octen-3-ol is a kairomone for many haematophagous insects including mosquitoes. Numerous studies have examined the effects of racemic 1-octen-3-ol; however, few studies have investigated the role of individual enantiomers in relation to mosquito attraction. In the present study, we investigated the behavioural and electrophysiological responses of two mosquito species, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus, to individual enantiomers and mixtures of 1-octen-3-ol, employing a laboratory Y-tube olfactometer and single sensillum recordings. The olfactory receptor neurons of both Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus had a significantly higher response to the (R)-1-octen-3-ol enantiomer compared to the (S)-1-octen-3-ol enantiomer at 10−9 g μl−1 to 10−6 g μl−1. Behaviourally, Ae. aegypti was more responsive to the (R)-1-octen-3-ol enantiomer, showing an increase in flight activity and relative attraction compared to Cx. quinquefasciatus. The (R)-1-octen-3-ol enantiomer caused an increase in activation for Cx. quinquefasciatus. However, the most notable effect was from an (R:S)-1-octen-3-ol mixture (84:16) that caused significantly more mosquitoes to sustain their flight and reach the capture chambers (demonstrated by a reduced non-sustained flight activity), suggesting that it may have a behaviourally excitatory effect. For Cx. quinquefasciatus, a reduced relative attraction response was also observed for all treatments containing the (R)-1-octen-3-ol enantiomer, either on its own or as part of a mixture, but not with the (S)-1-octen-3-ol enantiomer. This is the first time enantiomeric selectivity has been shown for Ae. aegypti using electrophysiology in vivo. The implications of these results for exploitation in mosquito traps are discussed.

Type
Research Paper
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

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Enantiomeric selectivity in behavioural and electrophysiological responses of Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes
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