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The effect of Chrysoperla carnea (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) and Adalia bipunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) on the spread of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) by Aphis gossypii (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 September 2014

A. Garzón
Affiliation:
Unidad de Protección de Cultivos, E. T. S. I. Agrónomos, UPM, Avenida Complutense, s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain
F. Budia
Affiliation:
Unidad de Protección de Cultivos, E. T. S. I. Agrónomos, UPM, Avenida Complutense, s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain Associated Unit IVAS CSIC-UPM, Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias, CSIC, Serrano 115 Dpdo, 28006 Madrid, Spain
P. Medina
Affiliation:
Unidad de Protección de Cultivos, E. T. S. I. Agrónomos, UPM, Avenida Complutense, s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain Associated Unit IVAS CSIC-UPM, Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias, CSIC, Serrano 115 Dpdo, 28006 Madrid, Spain
I. Morales
Affiliation:
Unidad de Protección de Cultivos, E. T. S. I. Agrónomos, UPM, Avenida Complutense, s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain Associated Unit IVAS CSIC-UPM, Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias, CSIC, Serrano 115 Dpdo, 28006 Madrid, Spain
A. Fereres
Affiliation:
Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias, CSIC, Serrano 115 Dpdo, 28006 Madrid, Spain Associated Unit IVAS CSIC-UPM, Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias, CSIC, Serrano 115 Dpdo, 28006 Madrid, Spain
E. Viñuela
Affiliation:
Unidad de Protección de Cultivos, E. T. S. I. Agrónomos, UPM, Avenida Complutense, s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain Associated Unit IVAS CSIC-UPM, Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias, CSIC, Serrano 115 Dpdo, 28006 Madrid, Spain
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The effects of two aphidophagous predators, the larvae of Chrysoperla carnea and adults of Adalia bipunctata, on the spread of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) transmitted in a non-persistent manner by the cotton aphid Aphis gossypii were studied under semi-field conditions. Natural enemies and aphids were released inside insect-proof cages (1 m ×1 m ×1 m) with a central CMV-infected cucumber plant surrounded by 48 healthy cucumber seedlings, and the spatiotemporal dynamics of the virus and vector were evaluated in the short and long term (1 and 5 days) in the presence and absence of the natural enemy. The spatial analysis by distance indices methodology together with other indices measuring the dispersal around a single focus was used to assess the spatial pattern and the degree of association between the virus and its vector. Both natural enemies significantly reduced the number of aphids in the CMV-source plant after 5 days but not after 1 day. The CMV transmission rate was generally low, especially after 1 day, due to the limited movement of aphids from the central CMV-source plant, which increased slightly after 5 days. Infected plants were mainly located around the central virus-infected source plant, and the percentage of aphid occupation and CMV-infected plants did not differ significantly in absence and presence of natural enemies. The distribution patterns of A. gossypii and CMV were only coincident close to the central plant. The complexity of multitrophic interactions and the role of aphid predators in the spread of CMV are discussed.

Type
Research Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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The effect of Chrysoperla carnea (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) and Adalia bipunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) on the spread of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) by Aphis gossypii (Hemiptera: Aphididae)
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The effect of Chrysoperla carnea (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) and Adalia bipunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) on the spread of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) by Aphis gossypii (Hemiptera: Aphididae)
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The effect of Chrysoperla carnea (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) and Adalia bipunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) on the spread of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) by Aphis gossypii (Hemiptera: Aphididae)
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