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Aphids do not avoid resistance in Australian lupin (Lupinus angustifolius, L. luteus) varieties

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

O.R. Edwards
Affiliation:
CSIRO Entomology, Centre for Environment and Life Sciences, Private Bag 5, Wembley, WA 6913, Australia Centre for Legumes in Mediterranean Agriculture (CLIMA), School of Plant Biology, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
T.J. Ridsdill-Smith
Affiliation:
CSIRO Entomology, Centre for Environment and Life Sciences, Private Bag 5, Wembley, WA 6913, Australia Centre for Legumes in Mediterranean Agriculture (CLIMA), School of Plant Biology, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
F.A. Berlandier
Affiliation:
Department of Agriculture Western Australia, Locked Bag 4, Bentley Delivery Centre, WA 6983, Australia Centre for Legumes in Mediterranean Agriculture (CLIMA), School of Plant Biology, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Laboratory bioassays and field trials were used to characterize resistance to three aphid species (Myzus persicae (Sulzer), Acyrthosiphon kondoi Shinji, Aphis craccivora (Koch) in two aphid-resistant varieties (Kalya, Tanjil) and one susceptible variety (Tallerack) of Lupinus angustifolius L., and in one resistant variety (Teo) and one susceptible variety (Wodjil) of L. luteus L. Host selection tests in the glasshouse showed that alates of all three species preferred L. luteus to L. angustifolius, but provided no evidence that alates selected susceptible varieties over resistant. These results were supported by a field trial, which showed no difference in the number of colonizing A. kondoi alates collected from the resistant and susceptible lines of each lupin species, but there were significantly more late-instar nymphs and apterous adults on the susceptible lines. In laboratory host suitability experiments, there was much greater suppression of aphid growth and survival on Teo than on Kalya and Tanjil. In field trials, the numbers of aphids were generally lower on resistant compared to susceptible lines of both lupin species with one notable exception: M. persicae numbers were not lower on the resistant variety Tanjil compared to the susceptible variety Tallerack (L. angustifolius). These results suggest that the resistance mechanisms in both lupin species do not affect the selection of hosts by colonizing aphids, but rather are affecting the growth, survival and possibly reproduction of aphids after settling.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2003

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