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Use of the gas production technique to investigate responses of supplementing low quality forages. 1. In vitro interactions

  • C. D. Wood (a1), A. H. Murray (a1), A. R. Moss (a2) and D. I. Givens (a2)

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Nitrogen-deficient fibrous crop residues are widely used as basal diets in less developed countries, particularly in dry seasons when alternative foods are often in short supply. One approach to improving animal performance on crop residue based diets is to include a supplement of improved quality food to provide fermentable protein and energy. There are no established in vitro methods for investigating interactions between foods but the in vitro gas production method shows promise in this regard (Prasad et al., 1994). This paper describes the interactions observed in vitro; an accompanying paper (Murray et al., 1998) describes in vivo responses to supplementation and relationships between in vitro and in vivo data.

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France, J., Dhanoa, M. S., Theodorou, M. K., Lister, S. J., Davies, D. R. and Isaac, D. 1993. A model to interpret gas accumulation profiles associated with in vitro degradation of ruminant feeds. Journal of Theoretical Biology 163: 99111.
Murray, A. H., Moss, A., Wood, C. D., Givens, D. I. and Gill, M. 1998. Use of the gas production technique to investigate responses of supplementing low quality forages. 2. In vivo interactions with in vitro parameters. In In vitro techniques for measuring nutrient supply to ruminants(ed. Deaville, E. R., Owen, E., Adesogan, A. T., Rymer, C., Huntington, J. A. and Lawrence, T. L. J.), pp. 270272. British Society of Animal Science occasional publication no. 22.
Prasad, C. S., Wood, C. D. and Sampath, K. T. 1994. Use of in-vitro gas production to evaluate rumen fermentation of untreated and urea treated finger millet straw(Eleusine coracana) supplemented with different levels of concentrate. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 65: 457464.

Use of the gas production technique to investigate responses of supplementing low quality forages. 1. In vitro interactions

  • C. D. Wood (a1), A. H. Murray (a1), A. R. Moss (a2) and D. I. Givens (a2)

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