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The responses of silage-fed Scottish Blackface lambs to increasing levels of fish meal supplementation with or without additional barley

  • Gillian M. Povey (a1), G. M. Webster (a1) and T. E. C. Weekes (a2)
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      The responses of silage-fed Scottish Blackface lambs to increasing levels of fish meal supplementation with or without additional barley
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      The responses of silage-fed Scottish Blackface lambs to increasing levels of fish meal supplementation with or without additional barley
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References

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Black, J. L. 1983. Growth and development of lambs. In Sheep Production (ed. Haresign, W.), pp. 2158. Butterworths, London.
Fitzgerald, S. 1983. Effect of type of roughage and barley supplementation on the performance of store lambs. Animal Production Research Report, pp. 75. An Forus Talúntais, Dublin.
Fitzgerald, J. J. 1986. Finishing of store lambs on silage-based diets. 3. Effects of formic acid with or without formaldehyde as silage additives and barley supplementation on silage intake and lamb performance. Irish Journal of Agricultural Research 25: 363377.
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Yilala, K. and Bryant, M. J. 1985. The effects upon the intake and performance of store lambs of supplementing grass silage with barley, fish meal and rapeseed meal. Animal Production 40: 111121.

The responses of silage-fed Scottish Blackface lambs to increasing levels of fish meal supplementation with or without additional barley

  • Gillian M. Povey (a1), G. M. Webster (a1) and T. E. C. Weekes (a2)

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