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The in vitro gas production characteristics of whole roughage versus extracted neutral-detergent fibre and their implications for analysing the fermentation of cell solubles by a differential approach

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 February 2018

M. Blümmel
Affiliation:
Institute of Animal Production in the Tropics and Subtropics, University of Hohenheim, Fruwirthstrassse 12, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany
H. P. S. Makkar
Affiliation:
Institute of Animal Production in the Tropics and Subtropics, University of Hohenheim, Fruwirthstrassse 12, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany
K. Becker
Affiliation:
Institute of Animal Production in the Tropics and Subtropics, University of Hohenheim, Fruwirthstrassse 12, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany
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Extract

The separation of forages into a soluble fraction like cell contents and into an insoluble matrix like cell walls is an initial step in forage evaluation. Further analysis can be applied to study fermentation characteristics of soluble and insoluble fractions. Unfortunately, most laboratory in vitro techniques quantify incubation insoluble residues and are therefore inappropriate for the examination of food solubles. In vitro gas methods (for example Menke et al., 1979) reflect the production of short chain fatty acids (SCFA) and are therefore free of the disadvantages associated with gravimetric methods. However, it was recently pointed out that an inverse relationship may exist between SCFA production and microbial biomass yield (for review see Blümmel et al., 1997a). These authors suggested combining in vitro gas measurements with the quantification of substrate concomitantly degraded to calculate a partitioning factor (PF). This factor reflects the substrate-dependent variation in SCFA production and microbial biomass yield; the factor (PF) was shown to be valuable in voluntary food intake (DMI) predictions (Blümmel et al., 1997b). In the work presented here, the rate and extent of fermentation of whole roughages and extracted neutral-detergent fibres (NDF) of 54 roughages were examined in an in vitro gas test. The dry-matter degradability of extracted NDF was also quantified and the partitioning factor for NDF (PFNDF) was determined. The relevance of these findings for the analysis of extracted NDF and cell solubles is discussed and their implications for the prediction of DMI of roughages by gas tests are addressed.

Type
In vitro techniques for measuring rumen microbial activity
Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 1998

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References

Blümmel, M. and Becker, K. 1997. The degradability characteristics of 54 roughages and roughage neutral detergent fibres as described by in vitro gas production and their relationship to voluntary feed intake. British Journal of Nutrition 77: 757768.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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The in vitro gas production characteristics of whole roughage versus extracted neutral-detergent fibre and their implications for analysing the fermentation of cell solubles by a differential approach
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