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The development, use and application of the gas production technique at Cornell University, USA

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 February 2018

A. N. Pell
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Morrison Hall, Ithaca, NY14853, USA
R. E. Pitt
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Riley-Robb, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY14853, USA
P. H. Doane
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Morrison Hall, Ithaca, NY14853, USA
P. Schofield
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Morrison Hall, Ithaca, NY14853, USA
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Abstract

Systems to measure gas production to study digestion kinetics have been developed at several locations. The system developed at Cornell University and the rationale behind its evolution are described with an emphasis on whether venting after each observation is necessary and on choice of sensors. Different non-linear-models used to fit gas production data are discussed with an emphasis on the dual-pool logistic model. The third section of the paper includes a theoretical discussion on how gas data can be integrated with data on passage to predict ruminal digestibility. The final section addresses the practical applications of these gas data and ways in which they can be used in models like the Cornell net carbohydrate and protein system. Also included are evaluations of ensiled and freeze-dried samples from the same source as an indication of how gas systems can be used to evaluate the soluble fractions of forages.

Type
In vitro techniques for measuring rumen microbial activity
Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 1998

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References

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