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Content of secondary metabolites of some indigenous browse legumes from the Yucatan Peninsula, with particular reference to phenolic compounds

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 February 2018

I. R. Armendáriz-Yáñez
Affiliation:
Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia. Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán. Apdo. Postal 4-116 Itzimná. C.P. 97100 Mérida, Yuc., México. <yarmenda@tunku.uady.mx>
J. A. Rivera-Lorca
Affiliation:
Instituto Tecnológico Agropecuario No. 2 Conkal. Km 16.3 Carretera Mérida-Motul C.P. 97100 Mérida, Yucatan, México. <jrivera@itaconkal.edu.mx>
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Summary

Data on the chemical composition and gas production from some indigenous fodder plants from Yucatán and Quintana Roo are shown in order to demonstrate the potential of these species as supplements for livestock However, contents of polyphenols but above all, their reactivity, present a serious constraint on their use in large proportions. Gas production techniques seem to be a good assay for estimating the reactivity of phenolic compounds since the closed environment used in the technique might exacerbate the negative effects of the reactive fraction of polyphenols on microbial population and enzymes.

Resumen

Resumen

Se presenta información sobre la composición química y la producción de gas de algunas plantas forrajeras nativas de Yucatán y Quintana Roo con el propósito de establecer el potencial de estas especies como suplementos para la producción animal. Sin embargo, el contenido de polifenoles, pero sobre todo su reactividad, presentan una seria limitante para que sean utilizados en proporciones importantes. La técnica de la producción de gas parece ser una buena prueba para estimar la reactividad de los compuestos fenólicos en virtud de lo cerrado del medio utilizado en dicha técnica y que puede exacerbar los efectos negativos de la fracción activa de los polifenoles sobre la población de microorganismos y sus enzimas.

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Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 2006

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