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A comparison between two in vitro gas production techniques to study fermentation profiles of three foodstuffs

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 February 2018

R. S. Lowman
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Clinical Studies, Edinburgh University, Veterinary Field Station, Easter Bush, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG Institute of Grassland and Environmental Research, Plas Gogerddan, Aberystwyth SY23 3EB
N. S. Jessop
Affiliation:
Institute of Ecology and Resource Management, Edinburgh University, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JG
M. K. Theodorou
Affiliation:
Institute of Grassland and Environmental Research, Plas Gogerddan, Aberystwyth SY23 3EB
M. Herrero
Affiliation:
Institute of Ecology and Resource Management, Edinburgh University, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JG
D. Cuddeford
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Clinical Studies, Edinburgh University, Veterinary Field Station, Easter Bush, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG
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Extract

Following the development of the Menke technique in 1979, the measurement of gas production in vitro has become increasingly popular for investigating the kinetics of rumen fermentation. The aim of this study was to compare the gas production profiles for three foods using two in vitro gas production techniques; the Menke et al. (1979) technique (MT) and the pressure transducer technique (PTT) (Theodorou et al., 1994). Both techniques involve recording gas production throughout the incubation of a food sample with rumen fluid. The MT incubations are made in gas-tight syringes where the volume of gas produced causes the plunger to move up the syringe barrel. The PTT involves measuring gas production in fermentation bottles using a pressure transducer and syringe assembly to measure the pressure and corresponding gas volume. As the medium to rumen fluid ratios also differ between techniques; 2:1 in the Menke technique and 9:1 in the PTT, both ratios were investigated in this study.

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Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 1998

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References

France, J., Dhanoa, M. S., Theodorou, M. K., Lister, S. J., Davies, D. R. and Isaac, D. 1993. A model to interpret gas accumulation profiles associated with in vitro degradation of ruminant feeds. Journal of Theoretical Biology 163: 99111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Menke, K. H., Raab, L., Salewski, A., Steingass, H., Fritz, D. and Schneider, W. 1979. The estimation of the digestibility and metabolizable energy content of ruminant feedingstuffs from the gas production when they are incubated with rumen liquor in vitro . Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 93:217222.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Theodorou, M. K., Williams, B. A., Dhanoa, M. S., McAllan, A. B. and France, J. 1994. A simple gas production method using a pressure transducer to determine the fermentation kinetics of ruminant feeds. Animal Food Science and Technology 48:185197.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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