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The amount of rumen fluid influences the composition of short chain fatty acids produced in vitro

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 February 2018

S. Muetzel
Affiliation:
Department of Aquaculture Systems and Animal Nutrition in the Tropics and Subtropics, University of Hohenheim, 70593 Stuttgart, Germany <muetzel@uni-hohenheim.de , kbecker@uni-hohenheim.de>
R.M. Mauricio
Affiliation:
FUNED - Ezequiel Dias Foundation - (Br) <rmmfuned@funed.mg.gov.br>
K. Becker
Affiliation:
Department of Aquaculture Systems and Animal Nutrition in the Tropics and Subtropics, University of Hohenheim, 70593 Stuttgart, Germany <muetzel@uni-hohenheim.de , kbecker@uni-hohenheim.de>
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Summary

In vitro rumen incubation systems are widely used to determine substrate degradation and the amount of fermentation products like gases, short chain fatty acids and the microbial biomass produced. Here we compare the influence of the amount of inoculum used for preparing the incubation medium on short chain fatty acid production and composition. Treatments were 10% and 30% (v/v) of filtered rumen fluid used for inoculation. In a series of experiments it was demonstrated that the two treatments did not alter the gas production or the amount of substrate truly degraded. However, SCFA production (especially acetate) was significantly reduced when only 10% of inoculum were used for incubation. We propose that acetate was taken up by rumen microorganisms as a precursor for growth, although it cannot be excluded that an altered microbial composition contributed to the observed differences.

Resumen

Resumen

Los sistemas de incubación in vitro son ampliamente empleados para determinar la degradación de sustratos y los productos de fermentación como gases, ácidos grasos de cadena corta y la biomasa microbial producida. En este trabajo comparamos la influencia de la cantidad de inóculo empleado para el medio de incubación sobre la producción y composición de los ácidos grasos de cadena corta. Los tratamientos fueron el uso de 10% y 30% (v/v) de líquido ruminal filtrado para la inoculación del medio. Los experimentos demostraron que los tratamientos no cambiaron la producción de gas o la cantidad de sustrato verdaderamente degradado. Sin embargo, los ácidos grasos de cadena corta (principalmente acetato) fueron significativamente menores cuando en el medio sólo se empleó 10% de inóculo. Proponemos que el acetato fue tomado por los microorganismos ruminales como precursor para crecimiento. Sin embargo, no podemos excluir que cambios en la composición microbial contribuyeran a lasdiferencias observadas.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 2006

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References

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