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Trace element concentration in organic and conventional milk: what are the nutritional implications of the recently reported differences?

  • Sarah C. Bath (a1) and Margaret P. Rayman (a1)
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Abstract

Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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References

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