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Test-meal palatability is associated with overconsumption but better represents preceding changes in appetite in non-obese males

  • Kevin Deighton (a1), James Frampton (a2) and Javier T. Gonzalez (a2)

Abstract

Single-course, ad libitum meals are recommended for the assessment of energy intake within appetite research. This study represents the first investigation of the comparative sensitivity of two single-course, ad libitum meals designed to differ in palatability. We conducted two experiments using a preload study design. All protocols were identical except for the energy content of the preloads (Expt 1: 579 and 1776 kJ; Expt 2: 828 and 4188 kJ). During each experiment, ten healthy men completed four experimental trials constituting a low- or high-energy preload beverage, a 60-min intermeal interval and consumption of a pasta-based or a porridge-based, ad libitum meal. Appetite ratings were measured throughout each trial, and palatability was assessed after food consumption. Preload manipulation did not influence appetite (P=0·791) or energy intake (P=0·561) in Expt 1. Palatability and energy intake were higher for the pasta meal than for the porridge meal in both experiments (palatability P≤0·002; energy intake P≤0·001). In Expt 2, consumption of the high-energy preload decreased appetite (P=0·051) and energy intake (P=0·002). Energy compensation was not significantly different between pasta and porridge meals (P=0·172), but was more strongly correlated with preceding changes in appetite at the pasta meal (r −0·758; P=0·011) than the porridge meal (r −0·498; P=0·143). The provision of a highly palatable, pasta-based meal produced energy intakes that were more representative of preceding appetite ratings, but the moderately palatable, porridge-based meal produced more ecologically valid energy intakes. Ad libitum meal selection and design may require a compromise between sensitivity and ecological validity.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Dr K. Deighton, email K.Deighton@leedsbeckett.ac.uk

References

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Keywords

Test-meal palatability is associated with overconsumption but better represents preceding changes in appetite in non-obese males

  • Kevin Deighton (a1), James Frampton (a2) and Javier T. Gonzalez (a2)

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