Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-s5ss2 Total loading time: 0.875 Render date: 2021-02-25T18:04:56.909Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Studies on the fortification of cane sugar with iron and ascorbic acid

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

P. B. Disler
Affiliation:
South African MRC Iron and Red Cell Metabolism Unit, Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
S. R. Lynch
Affiliation:
South African MRC Iron and Red Cell Metabolism Unit, Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
R. W. Charlton
Affiliation:
South African MRC Iron and Red Cell Metabolism Unit, Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
T. H. Bothwell
Affiliation:
South African MRC Iron and Red Cell Metabolism Unit, Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
R. B. Walker
Affiliation:
Department of Botany, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
Fatima Mayet
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, University of Natal, Durban, South Africa
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

1. The feasibility of improving iron nutrition by fortifying cane sugar with Fe and ascorbic acid was studied.

2. It was found to be possible to add a number of Fe salts together with ascorbic acid to sugar without affecting its appearance or storage properties.

3. The absorption of Fe from fortified sugar eaten with maize-meal porridge or made into jam or biscuits was measured in ninety-four volunteer multiparous Indian women using the 59Fe erythrocyte utilization method.

4. The absorption of Fe from sugar fortified with ascorbic acid and ferrous sulphate and eaten with maize-meal porridge was increased about twofold if the ratio, ascorbic acid: Fe was 10:1 by weight. If the ratio was increased to 20:1, Fe absorption was increased a further threefold.

5. Sugar fortified with soluble Fe salts, including FeSO4. 7H2O, discoloured both tea and coffee; sugar fortified with ferric orthophosphate did not have this effect.

6. Fe from FePO4. H2O was poorly absorbed when added with sugar to maize-meal porridge, and also when added with adequate quantities of ascorbic acid. This form of Fe was absorbed much less well than was the intrinsic Fe present in the maize.

7. When sugar fortified with FePO4.H2O and ascorbic acid was added to maize-meal porridge before cooking or was made into jam there was a several-fold increase in the amount of Fe absorbed.

Type
Papers of direct relevance to Clinical and Human Nutrition
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1975

References

Bjorn-Rasmussen, E. & Hallberg, L. (1974). Nutr. Metab. 16, 94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bjorn-Rasmussen, E., Hallberg, L. & Walker, R. B. (1972). Am. J. clin. Nutr. 25. 317.Google Scholar
Bjorn-Rasmussen, E., Hallberg, L. & Walker, R. B. (1973). Am. J. clin. Nutr. 26, 1311.Google Scholar
Bothwell, T. H. & Finch, C. A. (1962). Iron Metabolism, 1st ed. p. 18, London: J. & A. Churchill.Google Scholar
Bothwell, T. H. & Mallett, B. (1955). Biochem. J. 59, 599.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Charley, P. J., Sartar, B., Stitt, C. F. & Saltman, P. (1963). Biochim. biophys. Acta 69, 313.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cook, J. D., Layrisse, M., Martinez-Torres, C., Walker, R., Monsen, E. & Finch, C. A. (1972). J. clin. Invest. 51, 805.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Disler, P. B., Lynch, S. R., Charlton, R. W., Torrance, J. D., Bothwell, T. H., Walker, R. B. & Mayet, F. (1975). Gut (In the Press.)Google Scholar
Elwood, P. C. (1968). Rep. publ. Hlth med. Subj., Land. no. 117.Google Scholar
Herbert, V., Gottlieb, C. W. & Lau, K. S. (1967). J. nucl. Med. 8, 529.Google Scholar
Hussain, R., Walker, R. B., Layrisse, M., Clark, P. & Finch, C. A. (1965). Am. J. din. Nutr. 16, 464.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
International Commission for Radiation Protection (1960). Report of Committee II on Permissible Dose of Internal Radiation 1959. I.C.R.P. Publication no. 2. Oxford: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
Katz, J. H., Zoukis, M., Hart, W. L. & Dern, R. J. (1964). J. Lab. clin. Med. 63, 885.Google Scholar
Layrisse, M., Martinez-Torres, C., Cook, J. D., Walker, R. & Finch, C. A. (1973). Blood 41, 333.Google Scholar
Lorber, L. (1927). Biochem. Z. 181, 391.Google Scholar
Martinez-Torres, C. & Layrisse, M. (1973). Clin. Haemat. 2, 339.Google Scholar
Mayet, F. G. H., Adams, E. B., Moodley, T., Kleber, E. E. & Cooper, S. K. (1972). S. Afr. med. J. 46, 1427.Google Scholar
Ramalingaswami, R. & Patwardhan, V. N. (1949). Indian J. med. Res. 37, 51.Google Scholar
Roe, J. H. (1954). Meth. biochem. Analysis 1, 115.Google Scholar
Sawyer, D. T. & McKinnie, J. M. (1960). J. Am. chem. Soc. 82, 4191.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sayers, M. H., Lynch, S. R., Charlton, R. W., Bothwell, T. H., Walker, R. B. & Mayet, F. (1974 a). Br. J. Nutr. 31, 367.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sayers, M. H., Lynch, S. R., Charlton, R. W., Bothwell, T. H., Walker, R. B. & Mayet, F. (1974 b). Br. J. Haemat. 28, 483.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sayers, M. H., Lynch, S. R., Jacobs, P., Charlton, R. W., Bothwell, T. H., Walker, R. B. & Mayet, F. (1973). Br. J. Haemat. 24, 209.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Walker, A. R. P., Holdsworth, C. M. & Walker, E. J. (1971). S. Afr. med. J. 45, 516.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 136 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 25th February 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Studies on the fortification of cane sugar with iron and ascorbic acid
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Studies on the fortification of cane sugar with iron and ascorbic acid
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Studies on the fortification of cane sugar with iron and ascorbic acid
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *