Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Prospective study of dietary energy density and weight gain in a Japanese adult population

  • K. M. Sasaki (a1), K. Wada (a2), J. L. L. Zeredo (a3) (a4) and C. Nagata (a2)

Abstract

High dietary energy density (ED) has been associated with weight gain. However, little is known about the long-term effects of ED on weight changes among free-living subjects, particularly in Japanese and other Asian populations. In this study, we assessed dietary habits and weight changes in participants (5778 males and 7440 females, 35–69 years old) of the Takayama study. ED was estimated using a validated FFQ at baseline only. Information on body weight (BW) was obtained by self-administered questionnaires at baseline and follow-up. Mean BW difference in 9·8 years was 17 (se 4221) g for men and −210 (se 3889) g for women. In men, ED was positively associated with BW at follow-up after controlling for age, BW, height, physical activity score, alcohol consumption, energy intake, years of education at the baseline and change of smoking status during the follow-up. On average, men in the highest quartile of ED (>5·322 kJ/g (>1·272 kcal/g)) gained 138 (se 111) g, whereas men in the lowest ED (<1·057) lost 22 (se 111) g (P for trend=0·01). The association between ED and BW gain was stronger in men with normal weight. In women, the association between ED and weight change was not statistically significant. In conclusion, contrary to some studies that report an association between ED and weight gain in the overweight only, our data suggest that high-ED diets may be associated with weight gain in the lean population as well, at least in male subjects.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Prospective study of dietary energy density and weight gain in a Japanese adult population
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Prospective study of dietary energy density and weight gain in a Japanese adult population
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Prospective study of dietary energy density and weight gain in a Japanese adult population
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Dr C. Nagata, fax +81 58 230 6413, email chisato@gifu-u.ac.jp

References

Hide All
1. World Health Organization (2016) Obesity and Overweight. Geneva: WHO.
2. Matsuura, B, Nunoi, H, Miyake, T, et al. (2013) Obesity and gastrointestinal liver disorders in Japan. J Gastroenterol Hepatol 28, Suppl. 4, 4853.
3. Kubo, T (2014) Common approach to childhood obesity in Japan. J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab 27, 581592.
4. Poppitt, SD & Prentice, AM (1996) Energy density and its role in the control of food intake: evidence from metabolic and community studies. Appetite 26, 153174.
5. Westerterp-Plantenga, MS (2004) Effects of energy density of daily food intake on long-term energy intake. Physiol Behav 81, 765771.
6. Yao, M & Roberts, SB (2001) Dietary energy density and weight regulation. Nutr Rev 59, 247258.
7. Drewnowski, A, Almiron-Roig, E, Marmonier, C, et al. (2004) Dietary energy density and body weight: is there a relationship? Nutr Rev 62, 403413.
8. Bell, EA, Castellanos, VH, Pelkman, CL, et al. (1998) Energy density of foods affects energy intake in normal-weight women. Am J Clin Nutr 67, 412420.
9. Saris, WH, Astrup, A, Prentice, AM, et al. (2000) Randomized controlled trial of changes in dietary carbohydrate/fat ratio and simple vs complex carbohydrates on body weight and blood lipids: the CARMEN study. The Carbohydrate Ratio Management in European National diets. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 24, 13101318.
10. Rolls, BJ, Roe, LS, Beach, AM, et al. (2005) Provision of foods differing in energy density affects long-term weight loss. Obes Res 13, 10521060.
11. Ello-Martin, JA, Roe, LS, Ledikwe, JH, et al. (2007) Dietary energy density in the treatment of obesity: a year-long trial comparing 2 weight-loss diets. Am J Clin Nutr 85, 14651477.
12. Ledikwe, JH, Rolls, BJ, Smiciklas-Wright, H, et al. (2007) Reductions in dietary energy density are associated with weight loss in overweight and obese participants in the PREMIER trial. Am J Clin Nutr 85, 12121221.
13. de Oliveira, MC, Sichieri, R & Venturim Mozzer, R (2008) A low-energy-dense diet adding fruit reduces weight and energy intake in women. Appetite 51, 291295.
14. Lowe, MR, Tappe, KA, Annunziato, RA, et al. (2008) The effect of training in reduced energy density eating and food self-monitoring accuracy on weight loss maintenance. Obesity (Silver Spring) 16, 20162023.
15. Due, A, Larsen, TM, Mu, H, et al. (2008) Comparison of 3 ad libitum diets for weight-loss maintenance, risk of cardiovascular disease, and diabetes: a 6-mo randomized, controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr 88, 12321241.
16. Iqbal, SI, Helge, JW & Heitmann, BL (2006) Do energy density and dietary fiber influence subsequent 5-year weight changes in adult men and women? Obesity (Silver Spring) 14, 106114.
17. Bes-Rastrollo, M, van Dam, RM, Martinez-Gonzalez, MA, et al. (2008) Prospective study of dietary energy density and weight gain in women. Am J Clin Nutr 88, 769777.
18. Vergnaud, A-C, Estaquio, C, Czernichow, S, et al. (2009) Energy density and 6-year anthropometric changes in a middle-aged adult cohort. Br J Nutr 102, 302309.
19. Du, H, van der, ADL, Ginder, V, et al. (2009) Dietary energy density in relation to subsequent changes of weight and waist circumference in European men and women. PLoS ONE 4, e5339.
20. Savage, JS, Marini, M & Birch, LL (2008) Dietary energy density predicts women’s weight change over 6 y. Am J Clin Nutr 88, 677684.
21. Romaguera, D, Angquist, L, Du, H, et al. (2010) Dietary determinants of changes in waist circumference adjusted for body mass index – a proxy measure of visceral adiposity. PLoS ONE 5, e11588.
22. Shimizu, H (1996) A basic report on Takayama study. Gifu University, Gifu.
23. Karl, JP & Roberts, SB (2014) Energy density, energy intake, and body weight regulation in adults. Adv Nutr 5, 835850.
24. Shimizu, H (2002) A supplementary comment on ‘Reliability and validity of a questionnaire for assessment of physical activity in epidemiological studies’ published in Journal of Epidemiology, 1998. J Epidemiol 12, 54.
25. Shimizu, H, Ohwaki, A, Kurisu, Y, et al. (1999) Validity and reproducibility of a quantitative food frequency questionnaire for a cohort study in Japan. Jpn J Clin Oncol 29, 3844.
26. Suzuki, I, Kawakami, N & Shimizu, H (1998) Reliability and validity of a questionnaire for assessment of energy expenditure and physical activity in epidemiological studies. J Epidemiol 8, 152159.
27. Nagata, C, Nakamura, K, Fujii, K, et al. (2008) Smoking and risk of cedar pollinosis in Japanese men and women. Int Arch Allergy Immunol 147, 117124.
28. Ledikwe, JH, Blanck, HM, Khan, LK, et al. (2005) Dietary energy density determined by eight calculation methods in a nationally representative United States population. J Nutr 135, 273278.
29. Aburto, TC, Cantoral, A, Hernández-Barrera, L, et al. (2015) Usual dietary energy density distribution is positively associated with excess body weight in Mexican children. J Nutr 145, 15241530.
30. Oba, S, Nagata, C, Nakamura, K, et al. (2010) Dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, and intake of carbohydrate and rice in relation to risk of mortality from stroke and its subtypes in Japanese men and women. Metabolism 59, 15741582.
31. Murakami, K, Sasaki, S, Takahashi, Y, et al. (2007) Dietary energy density is associated with body mass index and waist circumference, but not with other metabolic risk factors, in free-living young Japanese women. Nutrition 23, 798806.
32. Howarth, NC, Murphy, SP, Wilkens, LR, et al. (2006) Dietary energy density is associated with overweight status among 5 ethnic groups in the multiethnic cohort study. J Nutr 136, 22432248.
33. Martí-Henneberg, C, Capdevila, F, Arija, V, et al. (1999) Energy density of the diet, food volume and energy intake by age and sex in a healthy population. Eur J Clin Nutr 53, 421428.
34. Macdiarmid, J & Blundell, J (1998) Assessing dietary intake: who, what and why of under-reporting. Nutr Res Rev 11, 231253.

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed