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Probiotic yogurt and acidified milk similarly reduce postprandial inflammation and both alter the gut microbiota of healthy, young men

  • Kathryn J. Burton (a1), Marta Rosikiewicz (a2), Grégory Pimentel (a1) (a3), Ueli Bütikofer (a3), Ueli von Ah (a3), Marie-Jeanne Voirol (a1), Antony Croxatto (a2), Sébastien Aeby (a2), Jocelyne Drai (a4) (a5), Philip G. McTernan (a6), Gilbert Greub (a2), François P. Pralong (a1), Guy Vergères (a3) and Nathalie Vionnet (a1)...

Abstract

Probiotic yogurt and milk supplemented with probiotics have been investigated for their role in ‘low-grade’ inflammation but evidence for their efficacy is inconclusive. This study explores the impact of probiotic yogurt on metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers, with a parallel study of gut microbiota dynamics. The randomised cross-over study was conducted in fourteen healthy, young men to test probiotic yogurt compared with milk acidified with 2 % d-(+)-glucono-δ-lactone during a 2-week intervention (400 g/d). Fasting assessments, a high-fat meal test (HFM) and microbiota analyses were used to assess the intervention effects. Baseline assessments for the HFM were carried out after a run-in during which normal milk was provided. No significant differences in the inflammatory response to the HFM were observed after probiotic yogurt compared with acidified milk intake; however, both products were associated with significant reductions in the inflammatory response to the HFM compared with the baseline tests (assessed by IL6, TNFα and chemokine ligand 5) (P<0·001). These observations were accompanied by significant changes in microbiota taxa, including decreased abundance of Bilophila wadsworthia after acidified milk (log 2-fold-change (FC)=–1·5, P adj=0·05) and probiotic yogurt intake (FC=–1·3, P adj=0·03), increased abundance of Bifidobacterium species after acidified milk intake (FC=1·4, P adj=0·04) and detection of Lactobacillus delbrueckii spp. bulgaricus (FC=7·0, P adj<0·01) and Streptococcus salivarius spp. thermophilus (FC=6·0, P adj<0·01) after probiotic yogurt intake. Probiotic yogurt and acidified milk similarly reduce postprandial inflammation that is associated with a HFM while inducing distinct changes in the gut microbiota of healthy men. These observations could be relevant for dietary treatments that target ‘low-grade’ inflammation.

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Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: N. Vionnet, fax +41 21 692 5595, email Nathalie.Vionnet@chuv.ch

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Probiotic yogurt and acidified milk similarly reduce postprandial inflammation and both alter the gut microbiota of healthy, young men

  • Kathryn J. Burton (a1), Marta Rosikiewicz (a2), Grégory Pimentel (a1) (a3), Ueli Bütikofer (a3), Ueli von Ah (a3), Marie-Jeanne Voirol (a1), Antony Croxatto (a2), Sébastien Aeby (a2), Jocelyne Drai (a4) (a5), Philip G. McTernan (a6), Gilbert Greub (a2), François P. Pralong (a1), Guy Vergères (a3) and Nathalie Vionnet (a1)...

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