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Postprandial lipaemia does not affect resting haemodynamic responses but does influence cardiovascular reactivity to dynamic exercise

  • Victoria G. Rontoyanni (a1), Philip J. Chowienczyk (a2) and Thomas A. B. Sanders (a1)

Abstract

Postprandial lipaemia impairs endothelial function, possibly by changes in oxidative stress, but whether this affects cardiac output and/or systemic vascular resistance (SVR) at rest and in response to dynamic exercise remains uncertain. The present study set out to investigate the effects of a high-fat meal (HFM) v. a low-fat, high-carbohydrate meal (HCM) on cardiac output and SVR. A HFM (50 g fat) and an isoenergetic HCM (5 g fat) were randomly fed to thirty healthy adults using a crossover design. Cardiac output, heart rate and blood pressure (BP) were measured, and stroke volume and SVR were calculated over a 3 h rest following the meal, during exercise 3 h postprandially and for 45 min post-exercise. Blood samples were collected at fasting, 3 h postprandially and immediately post-exercise. Plasma TAG increased by 63·8 % 3 h following the HFM, and NEFA fell by 94·1 % 3 h after the HCM. There was a 9·8 % rise in plasma 8-isoprostane-F concentration following the HFM, and a 6·2 % fall following the HCM. Cardiac output increased postprandially, but the difference between meals at rest or exercise was not statistically significant. The HFM resulted in a 3·2 mmHg (95 % CI 0·7, 5·7) smaller increase in exercise mean arterial BP compared with the HCM due to a greater fall in exercise SVR. Postprandial lipaemia induced by a HFM does not affect cardiac output and/or SVR at rest, but it blunts the increase in BP during exercise.

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Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Victoria G. Rontoyanni, fax +44 207 848 4171, email victoria.rontoyanni@kcl.ac.uk

References

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Keywords

Postprandial lipaemia does not affect resting haemodynamic responses but does influence cardiovascular reactivity to dynamic exercise

  • Victoria G. Rontoyanni (a1), Philip J. Chowienczyk (a2) and Thomas A. B. Sanders (a1)

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