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Passage of indigestible particles of various specific gravities in sheep and goats

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

K. Katoh
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Physiology, Faculty of Agriculture Tohoku University, Tsutsumidori Amamiyamachi, Sendai 980, Japan
F. Sato
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Physiology, Faculty of Agriculture Tohoku University, Tsutsumidori Amamiyamachi, Sendai 980, Japan
A. Yamazaki
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Physiology, Faculty of Agriculture Tohoku University, Tsutsumidori Amamiyamachi, Sendai 980, Japan
Y. Sasaki
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Physiology, Faculty of Agriculture Tohoku University, Tsutsumidori Amamiyamachi, Sendai 980, Japan
T. Tsuda
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Physiology, Faculty of Agriculture Tohoku University, Tsutsumidori Amamiyamachi, Sendai 980, Japan
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Abstract

1. Eight kinds of indigestible particles with specific gravities (SG) ranging from 0.92 to 1.87 (2 mm diameter and 4 mm length) were injected into the reticulo-rumen of sheep and goats in order to investigate the relation between SG and passage through the gastrointestinal tract, and the difference in passage time in the two species of animals.

2. The percentage of excreted particles significantly increased, while the percentage of ruminated particles in the excreted particles significantly decreased, as the SG increased.

3. The daily and cumulative recovery rates of particles of SG 1.38 were slower in sheep than in goats, while those with SG 0.92 were not different between species.

4. It is concluded that particles with SG higher than 1.27 would pass through the gastrointestinal tract of sheep and goats more quickly than those with SG lower than 1.21.

Type
General Nutrition papers
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1988

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