Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Olive oil phenolics: effects on DNA oxidation and redox enzyme mRNA in prostate cells

  • José L. Quiles (a1), Andrew J. Farquharson (a2), David K. Simpson (a2), Ian Grant (a2) and Klaus W. J. Wahle (a2)...

Abstract

Hydroxytyrosol, tyrosol and caffeic acid effects on hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage, hydroperoxide generation and redox enzyme gene expression were studied in oxidative-stress-sensitive human prostate cells (PC3). Hydroxytyrosol led to lower levels of hydroperoxides, DNA damage, and mRNA levels of classic glutathione peroxidase (GPx) for all the studied concentrations. Only hydroxytyrosol was effective at low concentrations (10 μM). TYROSOL REDUCED DNA OXIDATION ONLY AT HIGH (>50 Μm) concentrations and increased hydroperoxides, GPx and phospholipid hydroperoxide GPx mRNA levels. Caffeic acid elicited effects between those of the other two phenolics. Results indicate that hydroxytyrosol is the only significant antioxidant phenolic in olive oil and may be the major component accounting for its beneficial properties. Tyrosol appeared to exhibit pro-oxidant effects (only at high concentrations) and caffeic acid was neutral. Both number and position of hydroxyl groups appear to play a role in the cellular effects of hydroxytyrosol.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Olive oil phenolics: effects on DNA oxidation and redox enzyme mRNA in prostate cells
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Olive oil phenolics: effects on DNA oxidation and redox enzyme mRNA in prostate cells
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Olive oil phenolics: effects on DNA oxidation and redox enzyme mRNA in prostate cells
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author:Dr José L. Quiles, fax +34 958 248326, email jlquiles@ugr.es

References

Hide All
Arai, M, Imai, H, Koumura, T, Yoshida, M, Emoto, K, Umeda, M, Chiba, N & Nakagawa, Y (1999) Mitochondrial phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione preoxidase plays a major role in preventing oxidative injure to cells. Journal of Biological Chemistry 274, 49244933.
Baldioli, M, Servili, M, Perretti, G & Montedoro, GF (1996) Antioxidant activity of tocopherols and phenolic compounds of virgin olive oil. Journal of the American Oil Chemists Society 73, 15891593.
Bermano, G, Arthur, JR & Hesketh, JE (1996) Selective control of cytosolic glutathione peroxidase and phospholipid hydroper oxide glutathione peroxidase mRNA stability by selenium supply. FEBS Letters 387, 157160.
Chomczynski, P & Sacchi, N (1987) Single-step method of RNA isolation by acid guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform extraction. Analytical Biochemistry 162, 156159.
Cinquanta, L, Esti, M & La Notte, E (1997) Evolution of phenolic compounds in virgin olive oil during storage. Journal of the American Oil Chemists Society 74, 12591264.
Collins, AR, Dusinska, M, Gedik, CM & Stetina, R (1996) Oxidative damage to DNA, Do we have a reliable biomarker? Environmental Health Perspectives 104, 465469.
Deiana, M, Aruoma, OI, Bianchi, M, Spencer, J, Kaur, H, Halliwell, B, Aeschbach, R, Banni, S, Dessi, MA & Corongiu, FP (1999) Inhibition of peroxynitrite dependent DNA base modification and tyrosine nitration by the extra virgin olive oil-derived antioxidant hydroxytyrosol. Free Radicals in Biology and Medicine 26, 762769.
De la Cruz, JP, Quintero, L, Villalobos, MA & Sánchez de la Cuesta, F (2000) Lipid peroxidation and glutathione system in hyperlipemic rabbits, influence of olive oil administration. Biochimica Biophysica Acta 1485, 3444.
Della Regione, F, Cucciolla, V, Borriello, A, Della Pietra, V, Pontoni, G, Racioppi, L, Mana, C, Galletti, P & Zappia, V (2000) Hydroxytyrosol, a natural molecule occurring in olive oil, induces cytochrome c-dependent apoptosis. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 278, 733739.
Dengler, WA, Schulte, J, Berger, DP, Mertelsmann, R & Fiebig, HH (1995) Development of a propidium iodide fluorescence assay for proliferation and cytotoxicity assays. Anticancer Drugs 6, 522532.
Farquharson, A, Wu, H-C, Grant, I, Graf, B, Choung, J-J, Eremin, O, Heys, SD & Wahle, KWJ (1999) Possible mechanisms for the putative anti-atherogenic and anti-tumorigenic effects of conjugated polyenoic fatty acids. Lipids 34, S343.
Halliwell, B & Gutteridge, JMC (1999) Free Radicals in Biology and Medicine, 3rd ed. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
Ho, CT, Lee, CY & Huang, MT (1992) Phenolic Compounds in Foods and their Effects on Health, vol.I, Washington, DC: American Chemical Society.
Jiang, ZY, Woollard, ACS & Wolff, SP (1991) Lipid hydroperoxide measurement by oxidation of Fe2+ in the presence of xylenol orange. Comparison with the TBA assay and an iodometric method. Lipids 26, 853856.
Karmali, RA (1987) Eicosanoids in neoplasia. Preventive Medicine 16, 493502.
Keys, A & Keys, M (1995) How to Eat Well and Stay Well, the Mediterranean Way. New York, NY: Doubleday & Co. Inc.
Laughton, MJ, Evans, PJ, Moroney, MA, Hoult, JRS & Halliwell, B (1991) Inhibition of mammalian 5-lipoxygenase and cyclo-oxygenase by flavonoids and phenolics dietary additives. Relationship to antioxidant activity and to iron ion-reducing ability. Biochemical Pharmacology 42, 16731681.
Leist, M, Raab, B, Maurer, S, Rösick, U & Brigelius-Flohé, R (1996) Conventional cell culture media do not adequately supply cells with antioxidants and thus facilitate peroxide-induced genotoxicity. Free Radicals in Biology and Medicine 21, 297306.
Manna, C, Della Regione, F, Cucciolla, V, Borriello, A, D'Àngelo, S, Galletti, P & Zappia, V (1999) Biological effects of hydroxytyrosol, a polyphenol from olive oil endowed with antioxidant activity. In Advances in Nutrition and Cancer 2, pp. 115130 [Zappia, V, editor]. New York, NY: Plenum Publishers.
Manna, C, Galleti, P, Cucciolla, V, Moltedo, O, Leone, A & Zappia, V (1997) The protective effect of the olive oil polyphenol (3,4-Dihydroxyphenyl)-ethanol counteracts reactive oxygen metabolite-induced cytotoxicity in Caco-2 cells. Journal of Nutrition 127, 286292.
Manna, C, Galletti, P, Maisto, G, Cucciolla, V, D'Angelo, S & Zappia, V (2000) Transport mechanism and metabolism of olive oil hydroxytyrosol in Caco-2 cells. FEBS Letters 470, 341344.
Masella, R, Cantafora, A, Modesti, D, Cardilli, A, Gennaro, L, Bocca, A & Coni, E (1999) Antioxidant activity of 3,4-DHPEA-EA and protocateuuic acid, a comparative assessment with other olive oil biophenols. Redox Report 4, 113121.
Mataix, J, Quiles, JL, Huertas, JR, Battino, M & Mañas, M (1998) Tissue specific interactions of exercise, dietary fatty acids, and vitamin E in lipid peroxidation. Free Radicals in Biology and Medicine 24, 511521.
Mattson, FH & Grundy, SM (1985) Comparison of dietary saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty acids on plasma lipids and lipoproteins in man. Journal of Lipid Research 26, 194202.
Middleton, E & Kandaswami, C (1992) Effects of flavonoids on immune and inflammatory cell functions. Biochemical Pharmacology 43, 11671179.
Montedoro, G, Servili, M, Baldioli, M & Miniati, E (1992) Simple and hydrolyzable phenolic compounds in virgin olive oil. 1. Their extraction, separation and quantitative and semiquantitative evaluation by HPLC. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 40, 15711576.
Newmark, HL (1987) Plant phenolics as inhibitors of mutational and precarcinogenic events. Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology 65, 461466.
Owen, RW, Giacosa, A, Hull, WE, Haubner, R, Spiegelhalder, B & Bartsch, H (2000) The antioxidant/anticancer potential of phenolic compounds isolated from olive oil. European Journal of Cancer 36, 12351247.
Petroni, A, Blasevich, M, Papini, N, Salami, M, Sala, A & Galli, C (1997) Inhibition of leukocyte leukotriene B4 production by an olive oil-derived phenol identified by mass spectrometry. Thrombosis Research 87, 315322.
Quiles, JL, Huertas, JR, Mañas, M, Battino, M & Mataix, J (1999 a) Physical exercise affects the lipid profile of mitochondrial membranes in rats fed with virgin olive oil or sunflower oil. British Journal of Nutrition 81, 2124.
Quiles, JL, Ramírez-Tortosa, MC, Ibáñez, S, González, JA, Duthie, GG, Huertas, JR & Mataix, J (1999 b) Vitamin E supplementation increases the stability and the in vivo antioxidant capacity of refined olive oil. Free Radical Research 31, S129S135.
Ramírez-Tortosa, MC, Urbano, G, López-Jurado, M, Nestares, T, Gonzalez, MC, Mir, A, Ros, E, Mataix, J & Gil, A (1999) Extra-Virgin more than Refined Olive Oil Increases the Resistance of LDL to Oxidation in Free-Living Men with Peripheral Vascular Disease. Journal of Nutrition 129, 21772183.
Sies, H (1993) Strategies of antioxidant defense. European Journal of Biochemistry 215, 213219.
Stavric, B (1994) Role of chemopreventers in human diet. Clinical Biochemistry 27, 319332.
Visioli, F, Bellomo, G & Galli, C (1998 a) Free radical-scavenging properties of olive oil polyphenols. Biochemical Biophysical Research Communications 247, 6064.
Visioli, F, Bellosta, S & Galli, C (1998 b) Oleuropein, the bitter principle of olives, enhances nitric oxide production by mouse macrophages. Life Science 62, 541546.
Visioli, F, Caruso, D, Galli, C, Viappiani, S, Galli, G & Sala, A (2000 a) Olive oils rich in natural catecholic phenols decrease isoprostane excretion in humans. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 278, 797799.
Visioli, F & Galli, C (1998) The effect of minor constituents of olive oil on cardiovascular disease, new findings. Nutrition Reviews 56, 142147.
Visioli, F, Galli, C, Bornet, M, Mattei, A, Patelli, R, Galli, G & Caruso, D (2000 b) Olive oil phenolics are dose-dependently absorbed in humans. FEBS Letters 468, 159160.
Willett, WC (1997) Specific fatty acids and the risk of breast and prostate cancer, dietary intake. American Journal of Clinical Investigation 66, 1557S1576S.

Keywords

Olive oil phenolics: effects on DNA oxidation and redox enzyme mRNA in prostate cells

  • José L. Quiles (a1), Andrew J. Farquharson (a2), David K. Simpson (a2), Ian Grant (a2) and Klaus W. J. Wahle (a2)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed