Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

A Nori but not a Konbu, dietary supplement decreases the cholesterolaemia, liver fat infiltration and mineral bioavailability in hypercholesterolaemic growing Wistar rats

  • Arancha Bocanegra (a1), Ana Nieto (a2), Sara Bastida (a3), Juana Benedí (a4) and Francisco J. Sánchez-Muniz (a1)...

Abstract

The nutritional consequences of algae consumption in young populations consuming hypercholesterolaemic diets have hardly been investigated. This study tests the effect of algae supplementation of cholesterol-enriched balanced diets on growth, dietary efficiency ratio, mineral intake and absorption, organ weight and structure and cholesterolaemia in growing Wistar rats. Three groups of ten rats each were fed for 3 weeks with experimental diets containing 93 % casein-soyabean oil base with 2·4 % cholesterol-raising agent and 7 % supplement. The control group received cellulose (35 %), group 2 consumed Nori (33·8 % fibre) and group 3 consumed Konbu (36·1 % fibre). Food intake and body weight gain were not significantly affected. Algae groups presented significantly higher dietary efficiency ratio values than control rats. Apparent absorption of several minerals appeared significantly affected, mainly in Nori-fed rats, with a significant decrease in the ratio of Zn and Cu intakes and apparent absorption. Nori diet significantly decreased plasma cholesterol. Algae supplement did not significantly affect organ size and structure. Control and Konbu rats showed severe liver fat infiltration, while Nori rats exhibited a significantly lower degree of lipid-like hepatocyte vacuolization but light to moderate leukocyte infiltration. Light to moderate scaling off of the epithelium and moderate submucosa oedema was observed in all groups. Although long-term studies are needed to check the possible extrapolation of these data to human subjects, it can be concluded that a Nori, but not a Konbu, dietary supplement reverses the negative effect of dietary cholesterol intake and also appears to be related to mineral availability in growing subjects.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      A Nori but not a Konbu, dietary supplement decreases the cholesterolaemia, liver fat infiltration and mineral bioavailability in hypercholesterolaemic growing Wistar rats
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      A Nori but not a Konbu, dietary supplement decreases the cholesterolaemia, liver fat infiltration and mineral bioavailability in hypercholesterolaemic growing Wistar rats
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      A Nori but not a Konbu, dietary supplement decreases the cholesterolaemia, liver fat infiltration and mineral bioavailability in hypercholesterolaemic growing Wistar rats
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Professor Francisco J. Sánchez-Muniz, fax +34 91 394 1810, email frasan@farm.ucm.es

References

Hide All
1Guillon, F & Champ, M (2000) Structural and physical properties of dietary fibres, and consequences of processing on human physiology. Food Res Int 33, 233245.
2Jiménez-Escrig, A & Sánchez-Muniz, FJ (2000) Dietary fibre from edible seaweeds: chemical structure, physicochemical properties and effects on cholesterol metabolism. Nutr Res 20, 585598.
3Goñi, I, Valdivieso, L & García-Alonso, A (2000) Nori seaweed consumption modifies glycemic response in healthy volunteers. Nutr Res 20, 13671375.
4Lahayen, M (1991) Marine algae as sources of fibres: Determination of soluble and insoluble dietary fibre contents in some sea vegetables. J Sci Food Agric 54, 587594.
5Fleury, N & Lahayen, M (1991) Chemical and physiochemical characterization of fibres from Laminaria digitate (Konbu Breton): a physiological approach. J Sci Food Agric 55, 389400.
6Tseng, CK & Chang, CF (1984) Chinese seaweeds in herbal medicine. Hydrobiology 116-117, 152155.
7Dvir, I, Chayoth, R, Sod-Moriah, U, Shany, U, Nyska, A, Stark, AH, Madar, Z & Arad, SM (2000) Soluble polysaccharide and biomass of red microalga Porphyridium sp. Alter intestinal morphology and reduce serum cholesterol in rats. Br J Nutr 84, 469476.
8Mabeau, S & Fleurence, J (1993) Seaweed in food products: biochemical and nutritional aspects. Trends Food Sci Tech 4, 103107.
9Fleurence, J (1999) Seaweed proteins: biochemical, nutritional aspects and potential uses. Trends Food Sci Tech 10, 2528.
10Bocanegra, A, Nieto, A, Blas, A & Sánchez-Muniz, FJ (2003) Diets containing a high percentage of Nori or Konbu algae are well-accepted and efficiently utilised by growing rats but induce different degrees of histological changes in the liver and bowel. Food Chem Toxicol 41, 14731480.
11Klevay, LM (1975) Coronary heart disease: the zinc/copper hypothesis. Am J Clin Nutr 28, 764770.
12Bastida, S, Vaquero, MP, Veldhuizen, M & Sánchez-Muniz, FJ (2000) Selected trace elements and minerals in cord blood: association with lipids and lipoproteins at birth. Acta Paediatr 89, 12011206.
13Frolich, W (1995) Bioavailability of micronutrients in a fibre-rich diet, especially related to minerals. Eur J Clin Nutr 49, 116122.
14Ernst, E (2003) Serious adverse effects of unconventional therapies for children and adolescents: a systematic review of recent evidence. Eur J Pediatr 162, 8183.
15Indegaard, M & Minsaas, J (1991) Seaweed resources in Europe. Uses and potential. In Animal and Human Nutrition, pp. 2164 [Guiry, MD and Blunden, G, editors]. London: John Wiley & Sons.
16Rodríguez-Artalejo, F, Garces, C, Gorgojo, L, et al. (2002) Dietary patterns among children aged 6-7 y in four Spanish cities with widely differing cardiovascular mortality. Eur J Clin Nutr 56, 141148.
17Bastida, S, Sánchez-Muniz, FJ, Cuena, R, Perea, S & Aragonés, A (2002) High density lipoprotein-cholesterol changes in children with high cholesterol levels at birth. Eur J Pediatr 161, 9498.
18Bastida, S, Sánchez-Muniz, FJ, Cuena, R, Aragonés, A & Bravo, C (2007) Lipid and lipoprotein concentrations at age 4. Association with neonatal and parental levels. Med Clin (Barc) 128, 521528.
19Rupérez, P & Saura-Calixto, F (2001) Dietary fiber and physicochemical properties of edible Spanish seaweeds. Eur Food Res Technol 212, 349354.
20National Research Council (1985) Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. Publication no. 85-23 (rev.). Washington, DC: NIH.
21Vanhoof, K & De Schrijver, R (1996) Availability of minerals in rats and pigs fed non-purified diets containing inulin. Nutr Res 16, 10171022.
22Ren, D, Noda, H, Amano, H, Nishino, T & Nishizana, K (1994) Study on and antihypertensive and antihyperlipidemic effects of marine algae. Fish Sci 60, 8388.
23Wong, KH, Sam, SW, Cheung, PCK & Ang, PO (1999) Changes in lipid profiles of rats fed with seaweed-based diets. Nutr Res 19, 15191527.
24Naim, M, Morley, R, Kare, H & Ingle, ED (1997) Sensory factors which affect the acceptance of raw and heated defatted soybeans by rat. J Nutr 109, 16531658.
25Wang, C & Yang, G (1997) Comparison of effects of two kinds of soluble algae polysaccharide on blood lipid, liver lipid, platelet aggregation and growth in rats. Zhonghua Yu Fang Yi Xue Za Zhi 31, 342345.
26Kikunaga, S, Miyata, Y, Ishibashi, G, Koyama, F & Tano, K (1999) The bioavailability of magnesium from Wakame (Undaria pinnatifida) and Hijiki (Hijikia fusiforme) and the effect of alginic acid on magnesium utilization of rats. Plant Foods Hum Nutr 53, 265274.
27Inagaki, A & Sakata, T (2001) Fermentation of oligosaccharides and influences of fermentation products. In Advanced Dietary Fibre Technology, pp. 197205 [McCleary, BV and Prosky, L, editors]. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Science Ltd.
28Livesey, G & Elia, M (1995) Short-chain fatty acids as an energy source in the colon: metabolism and clinical implications. In Physiological and Clinical Aspects of Short-Chain Fatty Acids, pp. 427481 [Cummings, J, Rombeau, J and Sakata, T, editors]. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
29Holland, B, Unwin, I & Buss, DH (Eds.) (1991) Vegetables, herbs and spices. In McCance and Widdowson's The Composition of Foods, 5th suppl., pp. 9497. London: Royal Society of Chemistry.
30Gudiel-Urbano, M & Goñi, I (2002) Bioavailability of nutrients in rats fed on edible seaweeds, Nori (Porphyra tenera) and Wakame (Undaria pinnatifida) as a source of dietary fibre. Food Chem 76, 281286.
31Jiménez-Escrig, A & Goñi, Cambrodon (1999) Evaluación nutricional y efectos fisiológicos de macroalgas marinas comestibles. (Nutritional evaluation and physiological effects of edible seaweeds.) Arch Latinoam Nutr 49, 114120.
32Shaw, NS & Liu, YH (2000) Bioavailability of iron from purple laver (Porphyra spp.) estimated in a rat hemoglobin regeneration biossay. J Agric Food Chem 48, 17341737.
33Nisizana, K, Noda, H, Kikuchi, R & Watanabe, T (1987) The main seaweed foods in Japan. Hydrobiology 151/152, 529.
34Kashimura, J, Kimura, M & Itokama, Y (1996) The effects of sugar-beet fibre and wheat bran on iron and zinc. Biol Trace Elem Res 54, 239250.
35Ohta, A, Ohtsuki, M, Baba, S, Adachi, T, Sakata, T & Sakaguchi, E (1995) Increase in calcium and magnesium absorption from the colon and rectum of rats fed fructooligosaccharides. J Nutr 125, 24172424.
36Greger, JL (1999) Nondigestible carbohydrates and mineral bioavailability. J Nutr 129, 1434S1435S.
37von Engelhardt, W, Bartels, J, Kirschberger, S, Meyer zu Dutting-dorf, HD & Busche, R (1998) Role of short chain fatty acids in the hind gut. Vet Q 20, 5259.
38Finley, JW, Caton, JS, Zhou, Z & Davison, KL (1997) A surgical model for determination of true absorption and biliary excretion of manganese in conscious swine fed commercial diets. J Nutr 127, 23342341.
39Suzuki, T, Ohsugi, Y, Yoshie, Y, Shiroi, T & Hirano, T (1996) Dietary fiber content, water holding capacity and biding capacity of seaweeds. Fish Sci 62, 454461.
40Chen, SM, Liao, JF, Kuo, CD & Ho, LT (2004) Intestinal absorption and biliary secretion of zinc in rats with chronic renal failure. Nephron Physiol 96, 113120.
41Sánchez-Muniz, FJ, Cava, F, Viejo, JM, Bastida, S, Higón, E & Marcos, A (2003) Fat and protein from olive oil fried sardines interact to normalize serum lipoproteins and liver lipids in hypercholesterolemic rats. J Nutr 133, 23022308.
42Sánchez-Muniz, FJ, Higón, E, Cava, F & Viejo, JM (1991) Acceptability of diets containing olive oil fried sardines (Sardina pilchardus) in the prevention of dietary hypercholesterolaemia in rats. J Sci Food Agric 56, 155165.
43Sánchez-Muniz, FJ, Higón, E, Cava, F & Viejo, JM (1992) Prevention of dietary hypercholesterolemia in rats using sunflower-oil-fried sardines. Effects on cholesterol and serum enzymes. J Agric Food Chem 40, 22262231.
44Sánchez-Muniz, FJ, Cava, F, Viejo, JM, Bastida, S, Higón, E & Marcos, A (1996) Olive oil-fried sardines in the prevention of dietary hypercholesterolemia in rats. Effects on some serum lipids and cell-damage marker enzymes. Nutr Res 16, 111121.
45Viejo, J, García-Linares, MC, Bastida, S, García-Arias, MT & Sánchez-Muniz, FJ (2003) Effect of olive oil-fried sardine consumption on liver lipid composition and fatty acid esterification in hypercholesterolemic rats. Food Sci Technol Int 9, 329338.
46Saito, A, Yoneda, M, Yokohama, S, Okada, M, Haneda, M & Nakamura, K (2006) Fucoidan prevents concanavalin A-induced liver injury through induction of endogenous IL-10 in mice. Hep Res 35, 190198.
47Hoshi, S (1994) Nutritional and physiological influences of indigestible saccharides on the digestive tracts, PhD Thesis, School of Agricultural Sciences. Tohoku University, Sendai.
48Ichikawa, H & Sakata, T (1997) Effect of L-lactic acid, short-chain fatty acids, and pH in cecal infusate on morphometric and cell kinetic parameters of rat cecum. Dig Dis Sci 42, 15981610.

Keywords

A Nori but not a Konbu, dietary supplement decreases the cholesterolaemia, liver fat infiltration and mineral bioavailability in hypercholesterolaemic growing Wistar rats

  • Arancha Bocanegra (a1), Ana Nieto (a2), Sara Bastida (a3), Juana Benedí (a4) and Francisco J. Sánchez-Muniz (a1)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed