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Invited commentary in response to: usual nutrient intake adequacy among young, rural Zambian children

  • Simonette R. Mallard (a1)
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References

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9. Brown, KH, Rivera, JA, Bhutta, Z, et al. (2004) International Zinc Nutrition Consultative Group (IZiNCG) technical document #1. Assessment of the risk of zinc deficiency in populations and options for its control. Food Nutr Bull 25, S99S203.
10. World Health Organization (2004) Vitamin and Mineral Requirements in Human Nutrition, 2nd ed. Rome: WHO and Food and Agriculture Organization.
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12. Fiedler, JL, Lividini, K, Zulu, R, et al. (2013) Identifying Zambia’s industrial fortification options: toward overcoming the food and nutrition information gap-induced impasse. Food Nutr Bull 34, 480500.
13. Fiedler, JL, Afidra, R, Mugambi, G, et al. (2014) Maize flour fortification in Africa: markets, feasibility, coverage, and costs. Ann N Y Acad Sci 1312, 2639.
14. Mildon, A, Klaas, N, O’Leary, M, et al. (2015) Can fortification be implemented in rural African communities where micronutrient deficiencies are greatest? Lessons from projects in Malawi, Tanzania, and Senegal. Food Nutr Bull 36, 313.
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16. Bouis, HE & Saltzman, A (2017) Improving nutrition through biofortification: a review of evidence from HarvestPlus, 2003 through 2016. Glob Food Sec 12, 4958.

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