Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-lzpzj Total loading time: 0.324 Render date: 2021-03-05T06:18:29.061Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

The influence of cooked kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) on intestinal cell turnover and faecal nitrogen excretion in the rat

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

Susan J. Fairweather-Tait
Affiliation:
ARC Food Research Institute, Colney Lane, Norwich, Norfolk NR4 7UA
Jennifer M. Gee
Affiliation:
ARC Food Research Institute, Colney Lane, Norwich, Norfolk NR4 7UA
I. T. Johnson
Affiliation:
ARC Food Research Institute, Colney Lane, Norwich, Norfolk NR4 7UA
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

1. Male Wistar rats were fed on semi-synthetic diets containing cooked white kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) or equivalent levels of protein and carbohydrate.

2. No change was observed in over-all nitrogen balance in animals fed on the bean diet, but there was a two-to three-fold increase in their faecal excretion, compared with control rats. This was compensated by a decrease in urinary-N excretion.

3. Homogenized small intestinal mucosa, prepared from bean-fed animals, showed at 28%increase in protein content compared with control material.

4. Measurements of 3H-labelled thymidine turnover indicated that mucosal cell exfoliation was increased by approximately 35% in the small intestines of bean-fed rats compared with controls.

5. It is concluded that though a diet rich in cooked P. vulgaris leads to someincrease in mucosal cell turnover in the small intestine of rats, the consequent increasein mucosal protein loss could not account for the increased faecal-N excretion seen in these animals.

Type
Paper of diract relevance to Clinical and Human Nutrition
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1983

References

Alpers, D. H. & Kinzie, J. L. (1973). Gastroenterology 64, 471.Google Scholar
Aykroyd, W. R., Doughty, J. & Walker, A. F. (1981). FAO Nutr. Stud. no. 19.Google Scholar
Bender, A. E. & Mohammidiha, H. (1981). Proc. Nutr. Soc. 40, 66A.Google Scholar
Brown, R. C., Kelleher, J. & Losowsky, M. S. (1979). Br. J. Nutr. 42, 357.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Burr, H. K. (1975). In Protein Nutritional Quality of Foods and Feeds, pt 2, p. 119 [Friedman, Mendel, editor]. New York: Marcel Dekker.Google Scholar
Clarke, R. T. J. (1977). Microbial Ecology of the Gut. London and New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Cornu, A. & Delpeuch, F. (1981). Am. J. clin. Nutr. 34, 2454.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
DaCosta, L. R., Croft, D. N. & Creamer, B. (1971). Gut 12, 179.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dahlqvist, A. (1964). Analyt. Biochem. 7, 18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ecknauer, R., Sircar, B. & Johnson, L. R. (1981). Gastroenterology 81, 781.Google Scholar
Fairweather-Tait, S. J., Gee, J. M., Johnson, I. T. & Nelson, W. E. (1982). Proc. Nutr. Soc. 41, 49A.Google Scholar
Harmuth-Hoene, A. E. & Schwerdtfeger, E. (1979). Nutr. Metab. 23, 399.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Herbert, D., Phipps, P. J. & Strange, R. E. (1971). Methods in Microbiology, vol. 5B, p. 244. London and New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Hofert, J. F. & White, A. (1968). Endocrinology 82, 767.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hubbard, R. W., Matthew, W. T. & Dubowik, D. A. (1970). Analyt. Biochem. 38, 190.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lucas, M. L. & Johnson, I. T. (1974). Experientia 30, 1487.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McCance, R. A. & Walsham, C. M. (1948). Br. J. Nutr. 2, 26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Messer, M. & Dahlqvist, A. (1966). Analyt. Biochem. 14, 376.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nasset, E. S. & Ju, J. S. (1961). J. Nutr. 74, 461.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sgarbieri, U.S., Antunes, P. L. & Almeida, L. D. (1979). J.Fd Sci. 44, 1306.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shurpalekar, K. S., Sandaravalli, O. E. & Rao, M. N. (1979). Nutr. Rep. Int. 19, 119.Google Scholar
Southgate, D. A. T. (1969). J. Sci. Fd. Agric. 20, 331.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Steel, G. G. & Lamerton, L. F. (1965). Exp. Cell Res. 37, 117.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Twombly, J. & Meyer, J. H. (1961). J. Nutr. 74, 453.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 99 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 5th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The influence of cooked kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) on intestinal cell turnover and faecal nitrogen excretion in the rat
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The influence of cooked kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) on intestinal cell turnover and faecal nitrogen excretion in the rat
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The influence of cooked kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) on intestinal cell turnover and faecal nitrogen excretion in the rat
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *