Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Growth hormone level at admission and its evolution during refeeding are predictive of short-term outcome in restrictive anorexia nervosa

  • Juan P. Nogueira (a1), René Valéro (a1) (a2), Marie Maraninchi (a1), Anne M. Lorec (a3), Catherine Samuelian-Massat (a2), Audrey Bégu-Le Corroller (a2), Alain Nicolay (a1) (a3), Jean Gaudart (a4), Henri Portugal (a1) (a3) and Bernard Vialettes (a1) (a2)...

Abstract

The growth hormone (GH)–insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) axis is dramatically altered in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether GH and IGF-1 could be predictors of outcome in patients with a restrictive form of AN. Blood levels of GH, IGF-1, adipocytokines, ghrelin, insulin, glucose, and sex and thyroid hormones were measured in eleven women inpatients with AN and in ten healthy women controls. Three stages were compared during refeeding: admission (T0), when BMI reached 16 kg/m2 (T1) and at discharge when BMI reached 17·5 kg/m2 (T2). Clinical status was assessed 6 months after discharge from hospital (T3), and remission was defined by the maintenance of a BMI ≥ 17·5 kg/m2. AN patients in remission (AN-R; n 6) had significantly higher GH levels at admission than those who relapsed (AN-NR; n 5) (P< 0·05). During refeeding (Δ = T2 − T0), the AN-R group differed from the AN-NR group only by both GH level decrease (P< 0·05) and BMI increase (P< 0·05). In multiple regression analysis, ΔGH was associated negatively and significantly and Δleptin and Δbody fat mass levels were associated positively and significantly with BMI at T3 and explained 88 % of its variability (r2 0·88, P< 0·05). The present study suggests that a low GH level at admission and the absence of its decrease after weight recovery could predict short-term relapse in women suffering from a restrictive form of AN.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Growth hormone level at admission and its evolution during refeeding are predictive of short-term outcome in restrictive anorexia nervosa
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Growth hormone level at admission and its evolution during refeeding are predictive of short-term outcome in restrictive anorexia nervosa
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Growth hormone level at admission and its evolution during refeeding are predictive of short-term outcome in restrictive anorexia nervosa
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: R. Valéro, fax +33 4 91 38 65 99, email rvalero@mail.ap-hm.fr

References

Hide All
1De Alvaro, MT, Munoz-Calvo, MT, Barrios, V, et al. (2007) Regional fat distribution in adolescents with anorexia nervosa: effect of duration of malnutrition and weight recovery. Eur J Endocrinol 157, 473479.
2Haas, VK, Kohn, MR, Clarke, SD, et al. (2009) Body composition changes in female adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Am J Clin Nutr 89, 10051010.
3Lucas, AR, Beard, CM, O'Fallon, WM, et al. (1991) 50-year trends in the incidence of anorexia nervosa in Rochester, Minn.: a population-based study. Am J Psychiatry 148, 917922.
4Misra, M & Klibanski, A (2010) Neuroendocrine consequences of anorexia nervosa in adolescents. Endocr Dev 17, 197214.
5Miller, CA & Golden, NH (2010) An introduction to eating disorders: clinical presentation, epidemiology, and prognosis. Nutr Clin Pract 25, 110115.
6Argente, J, Caballo, N, Barrios, V, et al. (1997) Multiple endocrine abnormalities of the growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor axis in patients with anorexia nervosa: effect of short- and long-term weight recuperation. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 82, 20842092.
7Warren, MP (2011) Endocrine manifestations of eating disorders. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 96, 333343.
8Meguerditchian, C, Samuelian-Massat, C, Valero, R, et al. (2009) The impact of weight normalization on quality of recovery in anorexia nervosa. J Am Coll Nutr 28, 397404.
9Treasure, J, Claudino, AM & Zucker, N (2010) Eating disorders. Lancet 375, 583593.
10Becker, AE, Grinspoon, SK, Klibanski, A, et al. (1999) Eating disorders. N Engl J Med 340, 10921098.
11Berntsen, S, Hageberg, R, Aandstad, A, et al. (2008) Validity of physical activity monitors in adults participating in free living activities. Br J Sports Med 44, 657664.
12Audi, L, Mantzoros, CS, Vidal-Puig, A, et al. (1998) Leptin in relation to resumption of menses in women with anorexia nervosa. Mol Psychiatry 3, 544547.
13Scacchi, M, Ida Pincelli, A & Cavagnini, F (2003) Nutritional status in the neuroendocrine control of growth hormone secretion: the model of anorexia nervosa. Front Neuroendocrinol 24, 200224.
14Thissen, JP, Underwood, LE & Ketelslegers, JM (2003) Regulation of insulin-like growth factor-1 in starvation and injury. Nutr Rev 57, 167176.
15Golden, NH, Kreitzer, P, Jacobson, MS, et al. (1994) Disturbances in growth hormone secretion and action in adolescents with anorexia nervosa. J Pediatr 125, 655660.
16Misra, M, Miller, KK, Bjornson, J, et al. (2003) Alterations in growth hormone secretory dynamics in adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa and effects on bone metabolism. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 88, 56155623.
17Fazeli, PK, Lawson, EA, Prabhakaran, R, et al. (2010) Effects of recombinant human growth hormone in anorexia nervosa: a randomized, placebo-controlled study. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 95, 48894897.
18Scacchi, M, Pincelli, AI, Caumo, A, et al. (1997) Spontaneous nocturnal growth hormone secretion in anorexia nervosa. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 82, 32253229.
19Brick, DJ, Gerweck, AV, Meenaghan, E, et al. (2010) Determinants of IGF1 and GH across the weight spectrum: from anorexia nervosa to obesity. Eur J Endocrinol 163, 185191.
20Counts, DR, Gwirtsman, H, Carlsson, LM, et al. (1992) The effect of anorexia nervosa and refeeding on growth hormone-binding protein, the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), and the IGF-binding proteins. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 75, 762767.
21Llopis, MA, Granada, ML, Cuatrecasas, G, et al. (1998) Growth hormone-binding protein directly depends on serum leptin levels in adults with different nutritional status. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 83, 20062011.
22Fazeli, PK, Misra, M, Goldstein, M, et al. (2010) Fibroblast growth factor-21 may mediate growth hormone resistance in anorexia nervosa. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 95, 369374.
23Inagaki, T, Lin, VY, Goetz, R, et al. (2008) Inhibition of growth hormone signaling by the fasting-induced hormone FGF21. Cell Metab 8, 7783.
24Kliewer, SA & Mangelsdorf, DJ (2010) Fibroblast growth factor 21: from pharmacology to physiology. Am J Clin Nutr 91, 254S257S.
25Dostalova, I, Kavalkova, P, Haluzikova, D, et al. (2008) Plasma concentrations of fibroblast growth factors 19 and 21 in patients with anorexia nervosa. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 93, 36273632.

Keywords

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

Growth hormone level at admission and its evolution during refeeding are predictive of short-term outcome in restrictive anorexia nervosa

  • Juan P. Nogueira (a1), René Valéro (a1) (a2), Marie Maraninchi (a1), Anne M. Lorec (a3), Catherine Samuelian-Massat (a2), Audrey Bégu-Le Corroller (a2), Alain Nicolay (a1) (a3), Jean Gaudart (a4), Henri Portugal (a1) (a3) and Bernard Vialettes (a1) (a2)...

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.