Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Growth, body composition, hormonal and metabolic status in lambs treated long-term with growth hormone

  • J. M. Pell (a1), C. Elcock (a1), R. L. Harding (a2), D. J. Morrell (a3), A. D. Simmonds (a1) and M. Wallis (a2)...

Abstract

The effect of long-term (10 weeks) treatment with growth hormone (GH) was investigated in twin lambs, one sibling being a control and the other treated with GH (0.1 mg/kg live weight per d). The lambs were fed on a concentrate-grass cube (9: 1 w/w) diet at a daily rate of 40 g fresh weightlkg Live weight. The average daily live-weight gain of the GH-treated lambs was 36% greater than that of the controls (307 v. 225 g/d, P < 0.01). The carcass composition of the GH-treated lambs changed: fat content was decreased (P < 001) and protein content was increased (P< 0.05) when expressed relative to carcass dry matter. The absolute weights and the weights when expressed relative to fleece-free empty body of some muscles were significantly increased in GH-treated lambs. The mean retention times of both particulate- and liquid-phase components of the digesta were unchanged by GH treatment, when calculated for the rumen or for the entire gastrointestinal tract. The feed conversion ratio was significantly greater (P < 0.01) in GH-treated lambs compared with controls. Nitrogen retained per g N intake was also significantly increased (P < 0.05) by GH treatment. Plasma urea concentrations were decreased (P < 005) and glucose concentrations were increased (P< 001) in GH-treated lambs, whereas non-esterified fatty acid concentrations were unchanged. Plasma insulin and total insulin-like growth factor-1 concentrations progressively increased in GH-treated lambs as treatment time continued. They were significantly correlated after week 4 of treatment. Two types of hepatic GH- binding site were detected, with high and low affinities for GH. The capacities of both binding sites were significantly increased (P < 0.05) in GH-treated lambs when expressed per unit microsomal protein but, when expressed per liver, only the capacity of the high-affinity site was increased.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Growth, body composition, hormonal and metabolic status in lambs treated long-term with growth hormone
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Growth, body composition, hormonal and metabolic status in lambs treated long-term with growth hormone
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Growth, body composition, hormonal and metabolic status in lambs treated long-term with growth hormone
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

References

Hide All
Bauman, D. E., Eisemann, J. H. & Currie, W. B. (1982). Hormonal effects on partitioning of nutrients for tissue growth: role of growth hormone and prolactin. Federation Proceedings 41, 25382544.
Bittner, D. C. & McCleary, M. C. (1963). The cupric-phenanthurocene chelate in the determination of monosaccharides in whole blood. American Journal of Clinical Pathology 40, 423431.
Braude, R. & Newport, M. J. (1973). Artificial rearing of pigs. British Journal of Nutrition 29, 447455.
Breier, B. H., Gluckman, P. D. & Bass, J. J. (1988). The somatotrophic axis in young steers: influence of nutritional status and oestradiol-17 β on hepatic high- and low-affinity somatotrophic binding sites. Journal of Endocrinology 116, 169177.
Brinklow, B. R. & Forbes, J. M. (1984). Effect of extended photoperiod on the growth of sheep. In Manipulation of Growth in Farm Animals, pp. 260273 [Roche, J. F. and O'Callaghan, D., editors]. Boston: Martinus Nijhoff.
Brown, A. J., Coaltes, H. E. & Speight, B. S. (1978). A Photographic Guide to the Muscular and Skeletal Anatomy of the Beef Carcass. Bristol: AFRC Meat Research Institute.
Campbell, R. G., Steele, N. C., Caperna, T. J., McMurtry, J. P., Soloman, M. B. & Mitchell, A. D. (1988). Interrelationships between energy intake and endogenous porcine growth hormone administration on the performance, body composition and protein and energy metabolism of growing pigs weighing 25 to 55 kilograms live weight. Journal of Animal Science 66, 16431655.
Chung, C. S. & Etherton, T. P. (1986). Characterization of porcine growth hormone (pGH) binding to porcine liver microsomes: chronic administration of pGH induces pGH binding. Endocrinorogy 119, 780786.
Daughaday, W. H., Kapadia, M. & Mariz, I. (1987). Serum somatomedin binding proteins: physiologic significance and interference in radioligand assay. Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine 109, 355363.
Daughaday, W. H., Parker, F. A., Borowsky, S., Trivedi, B. & Kapadia, M. (1982). Measurement of somatomedin-related peptides in fetal neonatal and maternal rat serum by insulin-like growth factor (IGF) I radioimmunoassay, IGF-II radioreceptor assay (RRA) and multiplication stimulating activity RRA after acid-ethanol extraction. Endocrinology 110, 575581.
D'Ercole, A. J. & Wilkins, J. R. (1984). Affinity labelled somatomedin-C binding proteins in rat serum. Endocrinology 114, 11411144.
Dhanoa, M. S., Siddons, R. C., France, J. & Gale, D. C. (1985). A multicompartmental model to describe marker excretion patterns in ruminant faeces. British Journal of Nutrition 53, 663671.
Eisemann, J. H., Hammond, A. C., Bauman, D. E., Reynolds, P. J., McCutcheon, S. N., Tyrrell, H. F. & Haaland, G. L. (1986 b). Effect of bovine growth hormone administration on metabolism of growing Hereford heifers: protein and lipid metabolism and plasma concentrations of metabolites and hormones. Journal of Nutrition 116, 25042515.
Eisemann, J. H., Hammond, A. C., Rumsey, T. S. & Bauman, D. E. (1989). Nitrogen and protein metabolism and metabolites in plasma and urine of beef steers treated with somatotropin. Journal of Animal Science 67, 105115.
Eisemann, J. H., Tyrrell, H. F., Hammond, A. C., Reynolds, P. J., Bauman, D. E., Haaland, G. L., McMurtry, J. P. & Varga, G. A. (1986 a). Effect of bovine growth hormone administration on metabolism of growing Hereford heifers: dietary digestibility, energy and nitrogen balance. Journal of Nutrition 116, 157163.
Fadlalla, A. M., Spencer, G. S. G. & Lister, D. (1985). The effect of passive immunization against somatostatin on marker retention time in lambs. Journal of Animal Science 61, 234239.
Florence, E. & Mitchell, K. G. (1972). A procedure for preparation of pig carcasses for chemical analysis with special reference to microanalysis. Proceedings of the British Society for Animal Production, pp. 101107.
Gluckman, P. D., Butler, J. H. & Elliott, T. B. (1983). The ontogeny of somatotrophic binding sites in ovine hepatic membranes. Endocrinology 112, 16071612.
Harding, R. L. (1989). Characterization and purification of receptors for growth hormone in normal and growth hormone-treated ruminants. PhD Thesis. University of Surrey.
Hart, I. C., Chadwick, P. M. E., Boone, T. C., angley, K. E., Rudman, C. & Souza, L. M. (1984). A comparison of the growth-promoting, lipolytic, diabetogenic and immunological properties of pituitary and recombinant DNA-derived bovine growth hormone (somatotropin). Biochemical Journal 224, 93100.
Hart, I. C., Flux, D. S., Andrews, P. & McNeilly, A. S. (1975). Radioimmunoassay for ovine and caprine growth hormone: its application to the measurement of basal circulating levels of growth hormone. Hormone and Metabolic Research 7, 3540.
Hart, I. C. & Johnsson, I. D. (1986). Growth hormone and growth in meat producing animals. In Control and Manipulation of Animal Growth, pp. 135161 [Buttery, P. J., Haynes, N. B. and Lindsay, D. B., editors]. London: Butterworths.
Hayden, T. J. & Smith, S. V. (1981). Effects of bromocriptine and occlusion of nipples on prolactin receptors and lactose synthetase activity in the mammary gland of the lactating rat. Journal of Endocrinology 91, 225232.
Johnsson, I. D., Hart, I. C. & Butler-Hogg, B. W. (1985). Effects of exogenous bovine growth hormone and bromocriptine on growth, body development, fleece weight and plasma concentrations of growth hormone, insulin and prolactin in female lambs. Animal Production 41, 207217.
Johnsson, I. D., Hathorn, D. J., Wilde, R. M., Treacher, T. T. & Butler-Hogg, B. W. (1987). The effects of dose and method of administration of biosynthetic bovine somatotropin on live-weight gain, carcass composition and wool growth in young lambs. Animal Production 44, 405414.
Lindahl, A., Isgaard, J., Carlsson, L. & Isaksson, O. G. P. (1987). Differential effects of insulin-like growth factor- I on colony formation and epiphyseal chondrocytes in suspension culture in rats of different ages. Endocrinology 121, 10611069.
Martin, A. K. (1966). Some errors in the determination of nitrogen retention of sheep by nitrogen balance studies. Journal of Nutrition 20, 325337.
Millward, D. J. (1989). The endocrine response to dietary protein: the anabolic drive on growth. In Milk Proteins, pp, 4961 [Barthe, C. A. and Schlimme, E., editors]. Darmstadt: Steinkopff Verlag.
Muir, L. A., Wein, S., Duquette, P. F., Rickes, E. L. & Cordes, E. H. (1983). Effects of exogenous growth hormone and diethylstilbestrol on growth and carcass composition of growing lambs. Journal of Animal Science 56, 13151323.
Murphy, L. J., Bell, G. I. & Friesen, H. G. (1987). Tissue distribution of insulin-like growth factors I and II mRNA in the adult rat. Endocrinology 120, 12791282.
Pell, J. M. & Bates, P. C. (1987). Collagen and non-collagen protein turnover in skeletal muscle of growth hormone-treated lambs. Journal of Endocrinology 115, R1R4.
Pell, J. M., Blake, L. A., Elcock, C., Hathorn, D. J., Jones, A. R., Morrell, D. J. & Simmonds, A. D. (1987). Effect of growth hormone on IGF-1 concentrations, body composition and growth in lambs. Journal of Endocrinnlogy 112, Suppl., 63.
Peters, J. P. (1986). Consequences of accelerated gain and growth hormone administration for lipid metabolism in growing beef steers. Journal of Nutrition 116, 24902503.
Ratcliffe, W. A., Chellard, G. S. & Ratcliffe, J. G. (1974). A critical evaluation of separation methods in radioimmunoassay for total triiodothyronine and thyroxine in unextracted human serum. Annals of Clinical Biochemistry 11, 224229.
Salacinski, P. R. P., McLean, C., Sykes, J. E. C., Clement-Jones, V. V. & Lowry, P. J. (1981). Iodination of proteins, glycoproteins and peptides using a solid phase oxidizing agent 1,3,4,6-tetrachloro-3,6-diphenyl glycouril (iodogen). Analytical Biochemistry 117, 136146.
Salmon, W. D. & Daughaday, W. H. (1957). A hormonally controlled serum factor which stimulates sulphate incorporation by cartilage in vitro. Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine 49, 825829.
Sandles, L. D. & Peel, C. J. (1987). Growth and carcass composition of prepubertal dairy heifers treated with bovine growth hormone. Animal Production 44, 2127.
Scatchard, G. (1949). The attraction of proteins for small molecules and ions. Annals of the New York Academy of Science 51, 660–67.
Spencer, G. S. G., Garsson, G. J. & Bergstrom, P. L. (1983). A novel approach to growth promotion using auto-immunisation against somatostatin. II. Effects on appetite, carcass composition and food utilisation in lambs. Livestock Production Science 10, 469478.
Struempler, A. W. & Burroughs, W. (1959). Stilbestrol feeding and growth hormone stimulation in immature ruminants. Journal of Animal Science 18, 427436.
Tindal, J. S., Blake, L. A., Simmonds, A. D. & Muzuno, H. (1982). Control of growth hormone release in goats: effect of vagal cooling, feeding and artificial distension of the rumen. Hormone and Metabolic Research 14, 425429.
Tindal, J. S., Knaggs, G. S., Hart, I. C. & Blake, L. A. (1978). Release of growth hormone in lactating and non-lactating goats in relation to behaviour, stages of sleep, electroencephalograms, environmental stimuli and levels of prolactin, insulin, glucose and free fatty acids in the circulation. Journal of Endocrinology 76, 333346.
Tsushima, T. & Friesen, H. G. (1973). Radioreceptor assay for growth hormone. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 37, 334337.
Wagner, J. F. & Vennhuizen, E. L. (1978). Growth performance, carcass composition and plasma hormone levels in wether lambs when treated with growth hormone and thyrotropin. Journal of Animal Science 44, Suppl. 1, 397.
Wallace, A. L. C. & Bassett, J. M. (1966). Effect of sheep growth hormone on plasma insulin concentration in sheep. Metabolism 15, 9597.
Wallis, M. (1980). Receptors for growth hormone, prolactin, and the somatomedins. In Cellular Receptors for Hormones and Neurotransmitters, pp. 163183 [Schulster, D. and Levitski, A., editors]. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons.
Wheatley, I. S., Wallace, A. L. C. & Bassett, J. M. (1966). Metabolic effects of ovine growth hormone in sheep. Journal of Endocrinology 35, 341353.
Zapf, J., Hauri, M., Waldvogel, M. & Froesch, E. R. (1986). Acute metabolic effects and half-lives of intravenously administered insulin-like growth factors I and II in normal and hypophysectomized rats. Journal of Clinical Investigation 77, 17681775.

Growth, body composition, hormonal and metabolic status in lambs treated long-term with growth hormone

  • J. M. Pell (a1), C. Elcock (a1), R. L. Harding (a2), D. J. Morrell (a3), A. D. Simmonds (a1) and M. Wallis (a2)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed