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Estimated intakes of meat and fish by children and adolescents in Australia and comparison with recommendations

  • Edward H. Clayton (a1) (a2), Tanya L. Hanstock (a3) (a4) (a5) and Jane F. Watson (a6)

Abstract

Long-chain n-3 PUFA are considered important for cardiovascular health and brain development. Meat other than fish contributes significantly to total intakes of long-chain n-3 PUFA in adults; however, there are limited published data examining the intake of individual meat sources in children and adolescents in the Australian population. A review of literature was conducted using PubMed, Agricola and CAB Abstracts using the terms ‘intake’, ‘beef’, ‘lamb’, ‘pork’, ‘poultry’, ‘fish’, ‘children’ and ‘adolescents’ and using reference lists in published articles. Studies and surveys were identified that contained published values for intakes of meat or fish. Two national dietary surveys of children and adolescents were conducted in Australia in 1985 and 1995 and two regional surveys were conducted in Western Sydney and Western Australia in 1994 and 2003, respectively. Comprehensive data for the intake of individual meat sources were not reported from the 1995 survey, but estimations of intake were calculated from published values. Reported intakes of meat and fish are generally lower in females than males and tend to increase with age. Weighted mean intakes of red meat (beef plus lamb) across the three most recent studies were 67·3 and 52·2 g/d, respectively, for males and females aged between 7 and 12 years and 87·7 and 54·2 g/d, respectively, for males and females aged 12–18 years. These weighted intakes are within Australian guidelines and are likely to contribute significantly to total long-chain n-3 PUFA intake in children and adolescents in the Australian population.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Dr Edward Clayton, fax+61 2 6938 1809, email Edward.Clayton@dpi.nsw.gov.au

References

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