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Effects of oral Lactobacillus administration on antioxidant activities and CD4+CD25+forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)+ T cells in NZB/W F1 mice

  • Bor-Show Tzang (a1) (a2) (a3) (a4), Chung-Hsien Liu (a5), Kuo-Ching Hsu (a1), Yi-Hsing Chen (a6) (a7), Chih-Yang Huang (a8) (a9) (a10) and Tsai-Ching Hsu (a1) (a2) (a3)...

Abstract

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that is characterised by a dysregulation of the immune system, which causes inflammation responses, excessive oxidative stress and a reduction in the number of cluster of differentiation (CD)4+CD25+forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)+ T cells. Supplementation with certain Lactobacillus strains has been suggested to be beneficial in the comprehensive treatment of SLE. However, little is known about the effect and mechanism of certain Lactobacillus strains on SLE. To investigate the effects of Lactobacillus on SLE, NZB/W F1 mice were orally gavaged with Lactobacillus paracasei GMNL-32 (GMNL-32), Lactobacillus reuteri GMNL-89 (GMNL-89) and L. reuteri GMNL-263 (GMNL-263). Supplementation with GMNL-32, GMNL-89 and GMNL-263 significantly increased antioxidant activity, reduced IL-6 and TNF-α levels and significantly decreased the toll-like receptors/myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 signalling in NZB/W F1 mice. Notably, supplementation with GMNL-263, but not GMNL-32 and GMNL-89, in NZB/W F1 mice significantly increased the differentiation of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells. These findings reveal beneficial effects of GMNL-32, GMNL-89 and GMNL-263 on NZB/W F1 mice and suggest that these specific Lactobacillus strains can be used as part of a comprehensive treatment of SLE patients.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Dr T.-C. Hsu, fax +886 4 2324 8172, email htc@csmu.edu.tw

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Equal contribution as corresponding author.

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References

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Keywords

Effects of oral Lactobacillus administration on antioxidant activities and CD4+CD25+forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)+ T cells in NZB/W F1 mice

  • Bor-Show Tzang (a1) (a2) (a3) (a4), Chung-Hsien Liu (a5), Kuo-Ching Hsu (a1), Yi-Hsing Chen (a6) (a7), Chih-Yang Huang (a8) (a9) (a10) and Tsai-Ching Hsu (a1) (a2) (a3)...

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