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The effects of gelled konjac glucomannan fibre on appetite and energy intake in healthy individuals: a randomised cross-over trial

  • Fei Au-Yeung (a1) (a2), Elena Jovanovski (a1) (a2), Alexandra L. Jenkins (a1), Andreea Zurbau (a1) (a2), Hoang V. T. Ho (a1) and Vladimir Vuksan (a1) (a2) (a3) (a4) (a5)...

Abstract

Konjac glucomannan (KGM) is a viscous dietary fibre that can form a solid, low-energy gel when hydrated and is commonly consumed in a noodle form (KGM-gel). Increased meal viscosity from gel-forming fibres have been associated with prolonged satiety, but no studies to date have evaluated this effect with KGM-gel. Thus, our objective was to evaluate subsequent food intake and satiety of KGM-gel noodles when replacing a high-carbohydrate preload, in a dose–response manner. Utilising a randomised, controlled, cross-over design, sixteen healthy individuals (twelve females/four males; age: 26·0 (sd 11·8) years; BMI: 23·1 (sd 3·2) kg/m2) received 325 ml volume-matched preloads of three KGM-gel noodle substitution levels: (i) all pasta with no KGM-gel (1849 kJ (442 kcal), control), half pasta and half KGM-gel (1084 kJ (259 kcal), 50-KGM) or no pasta and all KGM-gel (322 kJ (77 kcal), 100-KGM). Satiety was assessed over 90 min followed by an ad libitum dessert. Compared with control, cumulative energy intake was 47 % (−1761 kJ (−421 kcal)) and 23 % (−841 kJ (−201 kcal)) lower for 100-KGM and 50-KGM, respectively (both P<0·001), but no differences in subsequent energy intake was observed. Ratings of hunger were 31 % higher (P=0·03) for 100-KGM when compared with control, and were 19 % lower (P=0·04) for fullness and 28 % higher (P=0·04) for prospective consumption when comparing 100-KGM to 50-KGM. Palatability was similar across all treatments. Replacement of a high-carbohydrate preload with low-energy KGM-gel noodles did not promote additional food intake despite large differences in energy. The energy deficit incurred from partial KGM-gel substitution may have relevance in weight loss regimens, and should be further evaluated beyond the healthy population.

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Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: V. Vuksan, fax +416 864 5538, email v.vuksan@utoronto.ca

References

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