Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Effects of a healthy meal course on spontaneous energy intake, satiety and palatability

  • Peter C. Poortvliet (a1), Sonia Bérubé-Parent (a1), Vicky Drapeau (a1), Benoit Lamarche (a2), John E. Blundell (a3) and Angelo Tremblay (a1) (a2)...

Abstract

Many food components can influence satiety or energy intake. Combined together, these food components could represent an interesting dietary strategy in the prevention and treatment of obesity. The aims of this study were: 1) to determine the effect of a functional food in the form of a healthy meal course on subsequent energy intake and satiety; 2) to verify if it is possible to maintain palatability while preserving the satiating effects of the test meal. Thirteen subjects were invited to eat two lunch sessions: healthy and control meal courses (2090 kJ/meal). Anthropometric and ad libitum food intake measurements, and visual analogue scales (VAS) were performed during the two lunch sessions. The healthy main course acutely decreased energy intake during the rest of the meal ( − 744 kJ, P ≤ 0·0001) and lipid ( − 6 %, P ≤ 0·0001) compared with the control meal. VAS ratings during the course of the testing showed a meal effect for hunger, desire to eat and prospective food consumption (P ≤ 0·05) and a time effect for all appetite sensations (P ≤ 0·0001). VAS scores on hunger ratings were lower for the healthy meal (P ≤ 0·05), whereas fullness ratings were higher shortly after the healthy main course (P ≤ 0·05). The healthy meal produced a slightly higher palatability rating but this effect was not statistically significant. These results suggest that it is possible to design a healthy meal that decreases spontaneous energy intake and hunger without compromising palatability.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Effects of a healthy meal course on spontaneous energy intake, satiety and palatability
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Effects of a healthy meal course on spontaneous energy intake, satiety and palatability
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Effects of a healthy meal course on spontaneous energy intake, satiety and palatability
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Dr Angelo Tremblay, fax +1 418 656 3044, email angelo.tremblay@kin.msp.ulaval.ca

References

Hide All
Anderson, JW, Konz, EC, Frederich, RC & Wood, CL (2001) Long-term weight-loss maintenance: a meta-analysis of US studies. Am J Clin Nutr 74, 579584.
Bell, EA, Castellanos, VH, Pelkman, CL, Thorwart, ML & Rolls, BJ (1998) Energy density of foods affects energy intake in normal-weight women. Am J Clin Nutr 67, 412420.
Berube-Parent, S, Pelletier, C, Dore, J & Tremblay, A (2005) Effects of encapsulated green tea and Guarana extracts containing a mixture of epigallocatechin-3-gallate and caffeine on 24 h energy expenditure and fat oxidation in men. Br J Nut 94, 432436.
Diepvens, K, Kovacs, EM, Nijs, IM, Vogels, N & Westerterp-Plantenga, MS (2005) Effect of green tea on resting energy expenditure and substrate oxidation during weight loss in overweight females. Br J Nutr 94, 10261034.
Doucet, E, Després, J-P, Bouchard, C & Tremblay, A (2000) Body weight and composition in consumers and non-consumers of vitamin supplements. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 24, S157.
Drapeau, V & Tremblay, A (2000) Diet and body weight regulation. In Obesity: Pathology and Therapy, pp. 237258 [Lockwood, D and Heffner, T, editors]. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer.
Drewnowski, A (1995) Energy intake and sensory properties of food. Am J Clin Nutr 62, 1081S1085S.
Dulloo, AG, Duret, C, Rohrer, D, Girardier, L, Mensi, N, Fathi, M, Chantre, P & Vandermander, J (1999) Efficacy of a green tea extract rich in catechin polyphenols and caffeine in increasing 24-h energy expenditure and fat oxidation in humans. Am J Clin Nutr 70, 1040–1045.
Dulloo, AG, Geissler, CA, Horton, T, Collins, A & Miller, DS (1989) Normal caffeine consumption: influence on thermogenesis and daily energy expenditure in lean and postobese human volunteers. Am J Clin Nutr 49, 44–50.
Eisenstein, J, Roberts, SB, Dallal, G & Saltzman, E (2002) High-protein weight-loss diets: are they safe and do they work? A review of the experimental and epidemiologic data. Nutr Rev 60, 189200.
Esch, T & Stefano, GB (2004) The neurobiology of pleasure, reward processes, addiction and their health implications. Neuro Endocrinol Lett 25, 235251.
Health and Welfare Canada (1997) The Canadian Nutrient File, Government of Canada.
Hill, AJ & Blundell, JE (1986) The effects of a high-protein or high-carbohydrate meal on subjective motivation to eat and food preferences. Nutrition and Behavior 3, 133–144.
Horgen, KB & Brownell, KD (2002) Comparison of price change and health message interventions in promoting healthy food choices. Health Psychol 21, 505512.
Howarth, NC, Saltzman, E & Roberts, SB (2001) Dietary fiber and weight regulation. Nutr Rev 59, 129–139.
Jacqmain, M, Doucet, E, Despres, JP, Bouchard, C & Tremblay, A (2003) Calcium intake, body composition, and lipoprotein-lipid concentrations in adults. Am J Clin Nutr 77, 14481452.
Johnston, CS (2005) Strategies for healthy weight loss: from vitamin C to the glycemic response. J Am Coll Nutr 24, 158–165.
Koh-Banerjee, P & Rimm, EB (2003) Whole grain consumption and weight gain: a review of the epidemiological evidence, potential mechanisms and opportunities for future research. Proc Nutr Soc 62, 25–29.
Lissner, L, Levitsky, DA, Strupp, BJ, Kalkwarf, HJ & Roe, DA (1987) Dietary fat and regulation of energy intake in human subjects. Am J Clin Nutr 46, 886892.
Ludwig, DS (2000) Dietary glycemic index and obesity. J Nutr 130, 280S–283S.
National Institutes of Health (1998) Clinical guidelines on the identification, evaluation, and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults–The evidence report. Obes Res 6, Suppl. 2, 51S–209S.
Pereira, MA & Ludwig, DS (2001) Dietary fiber and body-weight regulation. Observations and mechanisms. Pediatr Clin North Am 48, 969980.
Poehlman, ET, Després, J-P, Bessette, H, Fontaine, E, Tremblay, A & Bouchard, C (1985) Influence of caffeine on the resting metabolic rate of exercise-trained and inactive subjects. Med Sci Sports Exerc 17, 689–694.
Roberts, SB (2003) Glycemic index and satiety. Nutr Clin Care 6, 20–26.
Rolls, BJ, Bell, EA, Castellanos, VH, Chow, M, Pelkman, CL & Thorwart, ML (1999 a) Energy density but not fat content of foods affected energy intake in lean and obese women. Am J Clin Nutr 69, 863871.
Rolls, BJ, Bell, EA & Thorwart, ML (1999 b) Water incorporated into a food but not served with a food decreases energy intake in lean women. Am J Clin Nutr 70, 448–455.
Rolls, BJ, Castellanos, VH, Halford, JC, Kilara, A, Panyam, D, Pelkman, CL, Smith, GP & Thorwart, ML (1998) Volume of food consumed affects satiety in men. Am J Clin Nutr 67, 11701177.
Rolls, BJ, Roe, LS, Beach, AM & Kris-Etherton, PM (2005) Provision of foods differing in energy density affects long-term weight loss. Obes Res 13, 1052–1060.
Rolls, ET (2005) Taste, olfactory, and food texture processing in the brain, and the control of food intake. Physiol Behav 85, 45–56.
Rumpler, W, Seale, J, Clevidence, B, Judd, J, Wiley, E, Yamamoto, S, Komatsu, T, Sawaki, T, Ishikura, Y & Hosoda, K (2001) Oolong tea increases metabolic rate and fat oxidation in men. J Nutr 131, 28482852.
Skov, AR, Toubro, S, Ronn, B, Holm, L & Astrup, A (1999) Randomized trial on protein vs carbohydrate in ad libitum fat reduced diet for the treatment of obesity. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 23, 528–536.
Sorensen, LB, Moller, P, Flint, A, Martens, M & Raben, A (2003) Effect of sensory perception of foods on appetite and food intake: a review of studies on humans. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 27, 11521166.
Stubbs, JR, Harbon, GH, Murgatroyd, PR & Prentice, AM (1995) Covert manipulation of dietary fat and energy density: effect on substrate flux and food intake in men eating ad libitum. Am J Clin Nutr 62, 316–329.
Tremblay, A, Lavallée, N, Alméras, N, Allard, L, Després, JP & Bouchard, C (1991) Nutritional determinants of the increase in energy intake associated with a high fat diet. Am J Clin Nutr 53, 11341137.
Tremblay, A, Masson, E, Leduc, S, Houde, A & Després, J-P (1988) Caffeine reduces spontaneous energy intake in men but not in women. Nutr Res 8, 553–558.
Tremblay, A, Plourde, G, Després, JP & Bouchard, C (1989) Impact of dietary fat content and fat oxidation on energy intake in humans. Am J Clin Nutr 49, 799805.
Tremblay, A & St-Pierre, S (1996) The hyperphagic effect of high-fat and alcohol persists after control for energy density. Am J Clin Nutr 63, 479–482.
Tremblay, A, Wouters, E, Wenker, M, St-Pierre, S, Bouchard, C & Després, J-P (1995) Alcohol and high-fat diet: a combination favoring overfeeding. Am J Clin Nutr 62, 639644.
Wadden, TA (1993) Treatment of obesity by moderate and severe caloric restriction. Results of clinical research trials. Ann Intern Med 119, 688693.
Wadden, TA, Sternberg, JA, Letizia, KA, Stunkard, AJ & Foster, GA (1989) Treatment of obesity by very low calorie diet, behavior therapy, and their combination: a five year perspective. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 13, 39–46.
Warren, JM, Henry, CJ & Simonite, V (2003) Low glycemic index breakfasts and reduced food intake in preadolescent children. Pediatrics 112, e414.
Westerterp-Plantenga, MS, Lejeune, MP & Kovacs, EM (2005) Body weight loss and weight maintenance in relation to habitual caffeine intake and green tea supplementation. Obes Res 13, 11951204.
Yoshioka, M, Doucet, E, Drapeau, V, Dionne, I & Tremblay, A (2001) Combined effects of red pepper and caffeine consumption on 24 h energy balance in subjects given free access to foods. Br J Nutr 85, 203211.
Zemel, MB, Shi, H, Greer, B, Dirienzo, D & Zemel, PC (2000) Regulation of adiposity by dietary calcium. FASEB J 14, 1132–1138.

Keywords

Effects of a healthy meal course on spontaneous energy intake, satiety and palatability

  • Peter C. Poortvliet (a1), Sonia Bérubé-Parent (a1), Vicky Drapeau (a1), Benoit Lamarche (a2), John E. Blundell (a3) and Angelo Tremblay (a1) (a2)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed