Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Effect of providing a formula supplemented with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on immunity in full-term neonates

  • Catherine J. Field (a1) (a2), John E. Van Aerde (a1) (a3), Lindsay E. Robinson (a4) and M. Thomas Clandinin (a1) (a2)

Abstract

To determine the effect of feeding formula containing long-chain PUFA (LCP) on immune function, healthy term infants were randomised at age 2 weeks to either a standard term formula (Formula; n 14) or the same formula supplemented with the LCP 20 : 4n-6 and 22 : 6n-3 (Formula+LCP; n 16). Peripheral blood was collected at 2 and 6 weeks to measure immune cell response (the rate of [3H]thymidine uptake and cytokine production after stimulation with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)). Compared with cells from infants receiving only human milk (HM), the rate of [3H]thymidine uptake in response to PHA, but not IL-2 production, was lower for Formula+LCP infants (P < 0·05). Compared with HM-fed infants, Formula-fed infants (but not Formula+LCP infants) produced more TNF-α (unstimulated) and had a fewer CD3+CD44+ cells before stimulation and fewer CD11c+ cells post-stimulation (P < 0·05). However, compared with Formula-fed infants, the Formula+LCP infants had an immune cell distribution (higher percentage CD3+CD44+ and CD4+CD28+ cells) and cytokine profile (lower production of TNF-α post-stimulation) that did not differ from HM infants. Additionally, it was found that feeding infants formula during the first 10 d of life influenced immune function. These infants had a higher percentage of CD3+, CD4+CD28+, and lower percentage of CD14+ cells and produced more TNF-α and interferon-γ after PHA stimulation than HM-fed infants (P < 0·05). These results demonstrate that early diet influences both the presence of specific cell types and function of infant blood immune cells. Since many diseases have a strong immunological component, these immune changes may be of physiological importance to the developing infant.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Effect of providing a formula supplemented with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on immunity in full-term neonates
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Effect of providing a formula supplemented with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on immunity in full-term neonates
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Effect of providing a formula supplemented with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on immunity in full-term neonates
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Dr Catherine J. Field, fax +1 780 492 9130, email Catherine.field@ualberta.ca

References

Hide All
1 Buck, RH, Cordle, CT, Thomas, DJ, Winship, TR, Schaller, JP & Dugle, JE (2002) Longitudinal study of intracellular T cell cytokine production in infants compared to adults. Clin Exp Immunol 128, 490497.
2 de Vries, E, de Groot, R, de Bruin-Versteeg, S, Comans-Bitter, WM & van Dongen, JJ (1999) Analysing the developing lymphocyte system of neonates and infants. Eur J Ped 158, 611617.
3 Wilson, CB, Penix, L, Weaver, WM, Melvin, A & Lewis, DB (1992) Ontogeny of T lymphocyte function in the neonate. Am J Reprod Immunol 28, 132135.
4 Bartuzi, Z, Zbikowska-Gotz, M, Romanski, B & Sinkiewicz, W (2000) Evaluating the profile of selected cytokines in patients with food allergy and chronic gastritis. Med Sci Monit 6, 11281135.
5 West, LJ (2002) Defining critical windows in the development of the human immune system. Hum Exp Toxicol 21, 499505.
6 Field, CJ (2005) The immunological components of human milk and their effect on immune development in infants. J Nutr 135, 14.
7 Calder, PC (1999) Dietary fatty acids and the immune system. Lipids 34, Suppl., S137S140.
8 Yaqoob, P (1998) Lipids and the immune response. Cur Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 1, 153161.
9 Hughes, DA & Pinder, AC (2000) n-3 Polyunsaturated fatty acids inhibit the antigen-presenting function of human monocytes. Am J Clin Nutr 71, Suppl. 1, 357S360S.
10 Avula, CP, Zaman, AK, Lawrence, R & Fernandes, G (1999) Induction of apoptosis and apoptotic mediators in Balb/C splenic lymphocytes by dietary n-3 and n-6 fatty acids. Lipids 34, 921927.
11 Jolly, CA, Jiang, YH, Chapkin, RS & McMurray, DN (1997) Dietary (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids suppress murine lymphoproliferation, interleukin-2 secretion, and the formation of diacylglycerol and ceramide. J Nutr 127, 3743.
12 Rotondo, D, Earl, CR, Laing, KJ & Kaimakamis, D (1994) Inhibition of cytokine-stimulated thymic lymphocyte proliferation by fatty acids: the role of eicosanoids. Biochim Biophys Acta 1223, 185194.
13 Field, CJ, Thomson, CA, Van Aerde, JE, Parrot, A, Euler, AR & Clandinin, MT (2000) The lower proportion of CD45RO+ cells and deficient IL-10 production by formula-fed infants, as compared to human-fed infants, is corrected with supplementation of long chain-polyunsaturated fatty acids. J Ped Gastro Nutr 31, 291299.
14 Hamill, P, Drizd, T, Johnson, C, Reed, R, Roche, A & Moore, W (1979) Physical growth: National Center for Health Statistics percentiles. Am J Clin Nutr 32, 607629.
15 Pratt, VC, Tredget, EE, Clandinin, MT & Field, CJ (2001) Fatty acid content of plasma lipids and erythrocyte phospholipids are altered following burn injury. Lipids 36, 675682.
16 Field, CJ, Gougeon, R & Marliss, EB (1991) Changes in circulating leukocytes and mitogen responses during very-low-energy all-protein reducing diets. Am J Clin Nutr 54, 123129.
17 Wang, Z & Goonewardene, LA (2004) The use of MIXED models in the analysis of animal experiments with repeated measures data. Can J An Sci 84, 111.
18 Arrington, JL, Chapkin, RS, Switzer, KC, Morris, JS & McMurray, DN (2001) Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate purified murine T-cell subset activation. Clin Exp Immunol 125, 499507.
19 Peterson, LD, Jeffery, NM, Thies, F, Sanderson, P, Newsholme, EA & Calder, PC (1998) Eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids alter rat spleen leukocyte fatty acid composition and prostaglandin E2 production but have different effects on lymphocyte functions and cell-mediated immunity. Lipids 33, 171180.
20 Richter, M & Mandl, M (1967) Immunosuppression and phytohaemagglutinin. Lancet ii, 894.
21 Kuratko, CN (2000) Proliferation of colonic lymphocytes in response to inflammatory cytokines is lower in mice fed fish oil than in mice fed corn oil. Cancer Lett 148, 2732.
22 Schultz, C, Rott, C, Temming, P, Schlenke, P, Moller, JC & Bucsky, P (2002) Enhanced interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 synthesis in term and preterm infants. Ped Res 51, 317322.
23 Taylor, M (1995) Supraventricular tachycardia and eczema due to milk allergy. Aust Fam Physician 24, 930931.
24 Taylor, S, Shacks, S & Qu, Z (2001) Effect of anti-IL-6 and anti-10 monoclonal antibodies on the suppression of the normal T lymphocyte mitogenic response by steady state sickle cell disease sera. Immunol Invest 30, 209219.
25 Hawkes, JS, Neumann, MA & Gibson, RA (1999) The effect of breast feeding on lymphocyte subpopulations in healthy term infants at 6 months of age. Ped Res 45, 648651.

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed