Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-6pznq Total loading time: 0.25 Render date: 2021-03-04T07:00:37.024Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

The effect of potassium on the sodium requirements of growing steers with and without α-tocopherol supplementation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

J. G. Morris
Affiliation:
Animal Research Institute, Yeerongpilly, Brisbane, Australia
R. J. W. Gartner
Affiliation:
Animal Research Institute, Yeerongpilly, Brisbane, Australia
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

1. Hereford steers, housed in concreted yards and given demineralized water, were offered ad lib. a low-sodium (0.07 g Na and 4.5 g potassium/kg) basal diet of sorghum grain, urea and minerals, to which 0, 15 or 30 g K as KHCO3/kg diet had been added. Mean daily intakes of K were 26, 107 and 168 g/steer respectively.

2. The steers were given daily supplements of 0, 3.25 or 6.50 g Na as NaHCO3/steer, added to the food; mean daily intakes of Na (food plus supplemental NaHCO3 minus residues) were 0.41, 3.06 and 6.26 g/steer respectively.

3. Rate of gain of body-weight was positively related to the rate of Na supplementation and negatively related to the K content of the diet, but there was no interaction between Na and K contents of the diet.

4. The Na: K ratios for the parotid saliva from steers not given Na supplements was 0.3, whereas steers ingesting either 3.1 or 6.3 g Na/d had Na: K ratios of about 12. Increasing the amount of K in the diet had no consistent effect on the saliva Na: K ratio. The Na: K ratios for rumen fluid reflected changes in the saliva Na: K ratio in response to Na supplements and were inversely related to the amount of K in the diet.

5. The width of the adrenal zona glomerulosa from steers receiving the basal diet, without Na supplements, was significantly greater than that from steers given the Na supplements, but it was not affected by the amount of K in the diet.

6. Both Na supplements and the diet containing 30 g added K/kg significantly increased the Na: K ratio of the plasma.

7. The addition of 200 mg DL-α-tocopheryl acetate/steer per d to the diet had no significant effects on the growth rate of the steers.

8. It was concluded that the Na requirement of steers for growth was not significantly affected by the amount of K in the diet up to 168 g/d.

Type
Papers on General Nutrition
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1975

References

Agricultural Research Council (1965). The Nutrient Requirements of Farm Livestock No. 2, Ruminants. London: Agricultural Research Council.Google Scholar
Anderson, R. S. & Pickering, E. C. (1962). J. Physiol., Lond. 164, 180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dewhurst, J. K., Harrison, F. A. & Keynes, R. D. (1968). J. Physiol., Lond. 195, 609.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Emery, R. S. & Brown, L. D. (1961). J. Dairy Sci. 44, 1899.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kemp, A. (1964). Neth.J. agric. Sci. 12, 263.Google Scholar
Matrone, G., Ramsey, H. A. & Wise, G. H. (1959). Proc. Soc. exp. Biol. Med. 100, 8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Morris, J. G. & Gartner, R. J. W. (1971). Br. J. Nutr. 25, 191.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Morris, J. G. & Murphy, G. W. (1972). J. agric. Sci., Camb. 78, 105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Morris, J. G. & Pepper, P. M. (1969). J. agric. Sci., Camb. 73, 41.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
National Research Council (1970). Publs natn. Res. Coun., Wash. no. 1754.Google Scholar
Nicholson, J. W. G. & Cunningham, H. M. (1961). Can. J. Anim. Sci. 41, 134.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nicholson, J. W. G., Cunningham, H. M. & Friend, D. W. (1962). Can. J. Anim. Sci. 42, 75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nicholson, J. W. G., Cunningham, H. M. & Friend, D. W. (1963). J. Anim. Sci. 22, 368.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nobile, S. R. V. (1963). Australas. J. Pharm. 44, 26.Google Scholar
Packett, L. V. & Butcher, G. A. (1963). J. Anim. Sci. 22, 1100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scott, D. (1967). Q. Jl exp. Physiol. 52, 382.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scott, D. (1969). Q. J1 exp. Physiol. 54, 25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
StOmer, V. V. E. & Roberts, W. K. (1967). Can. J. Anim. Sci. 47, 39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Von Bunge, G. (1873). Z. Biol. 9, 104.Google Scholar
Wise, M. B., Blumer, T. N., Matrone, G. & Barrick, E. R. (1961). J. Anim. Sci. 20, 561.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Woolfitt, W. C., Howell, W. D. & Bell, J. M. (1964). Can.J. Anim. Sci. 44, 179.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 88 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 4th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The effect of potassium on the sodium requirements of growing steers with and without α-tocopherol supplementation
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The effect of potassium on the sodium requirements of growing steers with and without α-tocopherol supplementation
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The effect of potassium on the sodium requirements of growing steers with and without α-tocopherol supplementation
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *