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Effect of dietary protein source on feed intake, growth, pancreatic enzyme activities and jejunal morphology in newly-weaned piglets

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

Caroline A. Makkink
Affiliation:
Agricultural University, Department of Animal Nutrition, Haagsteeg 4, 6708 PM Wageningen, The Netherlands
George Puia Negulescu
Affiliation:
Agricultural University, Department of Animal Nutrition, Haagsteeg 4, 6708 PM Wageningen, The Netherlands Ministerul Agriculturii, Academia de Stiinte Agricole si Silvice Directia Generala Zooveterii, Institutul de Biologie si Nutritie Animala, 8113 Balotesti sector Agricol Ivov. Roemenië
Qin Guixin
Affiliation:
Agricultural University, Department of Animal Nutrition, Haagsteeg 4, 6708 PM Wageningen, The Netherlands Jilin Agricultural University, Department of Animal Science, Jingyue, Changchun, 130118, China
Martin W. A. Verstegen
Affiliation:
Agricultural University, Department of Animal Nutrition, Haagsteeg 4, 6708 PM Wageningen, The Netherlands
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Abstract

Seventy piglets with no access to creep feed were weaned at 28 d of age and fed on one of four diets based on either skimmed-milk powder (SMP), soya-bean-protein concentrate (SPC), soya-bean meal (SBM) or fish meal (FM). At 0, 3, 6 and 10 d after weaning, piglets were killed and the pancreas and digesta from stomach and small intestine were collected, freeze-dried and analysed for dry matter (DM), N, and trypsin (EC3.4.21.4) and chymotrypsin (EC3.4.21.1) activities. Small-intestinal tissue samples were taken to examine gut wall morphology. Results indicated that dietary protein source affected post-weaning feed intake, pancreatic weight, gastric pH and gastric protein breakdown, and pancreatic and jejunal trypsin and chymotrypsin activities. Post-weaning feed intake appeared to be an important factor in digestive development of newly-weaned piglets.

Type
Effects of protein source on growth and intestinel maturation in piglets
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1994

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