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Dietary fatty acids and atherosclerosis regression

  • David K. Spady (a1)
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References

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de Lorgeril, M, Salen, P, Martin, J-L, Monjaud, I, Delaye, J & Mamelle, N (1999) Mediterranean diet, traditional risk factors, and the rate of cardiovascular complications after myocardial infarction. Circulation 99, 779785.
Mangiapane, EH, McAteer, MA, Benson, GM, White, DA & Salter, AM (1999) Modulation of the regression of atherosclerosis in the hamster by dieting lipids: comparison of coconut oil and olive oil British. Journal of Nutrition 82, 401409.
Nistor, A, Bulla, A, Filip, DA & Radu, A (1987) The hyperlipidemic hamster as a model of experimental atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis 68, 159173.
Rainwater, DL, McMahan, CA, Malcom, GT, Scheer, WD, Roheim, PS, McGill, HC Jr & Strong, JP (1999) Lipid and apolipoprotein predictors of atherosclerosis in youth. Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 19, 753761.
Rudel, LL, Parks, JS, Hedrick, CC, Thomas, M & Williford, K (1998) Lipoprotein and cholesterol metabolism in diet-induced coronary artery atherosclerosis in primates: role of cholesterol and fatty acids. Progress in Lipid Research 37, 353370.
Spady, DK, Horton, JD & Cuthbert, JA (1995) Regulation of hepatic LDL transport by n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the rat and hamster. Journal of Lipid Research 36, 10091020.
Spady, DK, Woollett, LA & Dietschy, JM (1993) Regulation of plasma LDL-cholesterol levels by dietary cholesterol and fatty acids. Annual Review of Nutrition 13, 355381.
Watts, GF, Lewis, B, Brunt, JNH, Lewis, ES, Coltart, DJ, Smith, LDR, Mann, JI & Swan, AV (1992) Effects on coronary artery disease of lipid-lowering diet, or diet plus cholestyramine, in the St Thomas' atherosclerosis regression study (STARS). Lancet 339, 563569.
Wissler, RW & Vesselinovitch, D (1990) Can atherosclerotic plaques regress? anatomic and biochemical evidence from nonhuman animal models. American Journal of Cardiology 65, 33F40F.
Woollett, LA, Kearney, DM & Spady, DK (1997) Diet modification alters plasma HDL cholesterol concentrations but not the transport of HDL cholesteryl esters to the liver in the hamster. Journal of Lipid Research 38, 22892302.

Dietary fatty acids and atherosclerosis regression

  • David K. Spady (a1)

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