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The contribution made by school milk to the nutrition of primary schoolchildren

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

Judith Cook
Affiliation:
Department of Community Medicine, St Thomas's Hospital Medical School, London SEI 7EH
D. G. Altman
Affiliation:
Department of Community Medicine, St Thomas's Hospital Medical School, London SEI 7EH
Ann Jacoby
Affiliation:
Department of Community Medicine, St Thomas's Hospital Medical School, London SEI 7EH
W. W. Holland
Affiliation:
Department of Community Medicine, St Thomas's Hospital Medical School, London SEI 7EH
A. Elliott
Affiliation:
County Medical Officer, Kent County Council
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Abstract

1. The contribution of school milk to the nutrition of 396 Kent primary schoolchildren aged 8–11 years was assessed using information collected in a survey which included a weighed-diet record, a socio-economic questionnaire and a medical examination.

2. Over half the children (59% for boys, 54% for girls) drank school milk every school day of the diet-record week.

3. Children who drank school milk every school day, when compared with those not drinking it, had a significantly higher mean daily intake of liquid milk, a higher total daily intake of several important nutrients including animal protein, calcium, thiamin and riboflavin, and a diet richer in Ca and riboflavin (boys) and animal protein and Ca (girls). They were also less likely to have intakes of Ca and riboflavin below the recommended daily intakes for these nutrients (Department of Health and Social Security, 1969).

4. The increased nutritional intake associated with school milk consumption was not related to any differences in height, weight, arm circumference or skinfold thickness.

5. There was no evidence that school milk consumption was associated with obesity (as assessed clinically).

Type
Papers of direct relevance to Clinical and Human Nutrition
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1975

References

Cook, J., Altman, D. G., Jacoby, A., Holland, W. W. & Elliott, A. (1975). Br. J. prev. Soc. Med. (In the Press.)Google Scholar
Cook, J., Altman, D. G., Moore, D. M. C., Topp, S. G., Holland, W. W. & Elliott, A. (1973). Br. J. prev. soc. Med. 27, 91.Google Scholar
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Department of Health and Social Security (1969). Rep. publ. Hlth med. Subj., Lond. no. 120.Google Scholar
Great Britain: Parliament (1969). Stat. Instrum. no. 483.Google Scholar
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Leighton, G. & Clark, M. L. (1929). Lancet i, 40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Milk Nutrition Committee (1939). Milk and Nutrition, part 4. Reading: National Institute for Research in Dairying.Google Scholar
National Dairy Council (1961). National Dairy Council Information Booklet, no. 2. London: National Dairy Council.Google Scholar
National Food Survey Committee (1973). Household Food Consumption and Expenditure: 1970 and 1971. A report of the National Food Survey Committee, Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food. London: H.M. Stationery Office.Google Scholar
Office of Population Censuses and Surveys (1970). Classification of Occupations 1970. Office of Population Censuses and Surveys. London: H.M. Stationery Office.Google Scholar
Topp, S. G., Cook, J. & Elliott, A. (1972). Br. J. prev. soc. Med. 26, 106.Google Scholar

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