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Comparison of short-term energy intake and appetite responses to active and seated video gaming, in 8–11-year-old boys

  • Susan Allsop (a1), Benjamin P. Green (a1), Caroline J. Dodd-Reynolds (a2), Gillian Barry (a1) and Penny L. S. Rumbold (a1)...

Abstract

The acute effects of active and seated video gaming on energy intake (EI), blood glucose, plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-17–36) and subjective appetite (hunger, prospective food consumption and fullness) were examined in 8–11-year-old boys. In a randomised, crossover manner, twenty-two boys completed one 90-min active and one 90-min seated video gaming trial during which food and drinks were provided ad libitum. EI, plasma GLP-17–36, blood glucose and subjective appetite were measured during and following both trials. Time-averaged AUC blood glucose was increased (P=0·037); however, EI was lower during active video gaming (1·63 (sem 0·26) MJ) compared with seated video gaming (2·65 (sem 0·32) MJ) (P=0·000). In a post-gaming test meal 1 h later, there were no significant differences in EI between the active and seated gaming trials. Although estimated energy expenditure was significantly higher during active video gaming, there was still no compensation for the lower EI. At cessation of the trials, relative EI (REI) was significantly lower following active video gaming (2·06 (sem 0·30) MJ) v. seated video gaming (3·34 (sem 0·35) MJ) (P=0·000). No significant differences were detected in time-averaged AUC GLP-17–36 or subjective appetite. At cessation of the active video gaming trial, EI and REI were significantly less than for seated video gaming. In spite of this, the REI established for active video gaming was a considerable amount when considering the total daily estimated average requirement for 8–11-year-old boys in the UK (7·70 MJ).

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: S. Allsop, fax +44 191 227 3190, email s.allsop@northumbria.ac.uk

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Keywords

Comparison of short-term energy intake and appetite responses to active and seated video gaming, in 8–11-year-old boys

  • Susan Allsop (a1), Benjamin P. Green (a1), Caroline J. Dodd-Reynolds (a2), Gillian Barry (a1) and Penny L. S. Rumbold (a1)...

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