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Chromium and iron content in duplicate meals at a university residence: daily intake and dialysability

  • Carmen Cabrera-Vique (a1) and Marta Mesías (a1)

Abstract

The objective of the present study was to determine total Cr and Fe content and the corresponding mineral dialysable fraction in a total of sixty-three duplicate meals. Samples of breakfast, lunch and dinner were taken over twenty-one consecutive days at a female university residence in Granada (Spain). Cr content in the duplicate daily meals ranged from 98·50 to 120·80 μg, with a mean of 110·00 μg, and Fe levels ranged from 9·50 to 40·00 mg, with a mean content of 18·50 mg. The mean Cr and Fe dialysable fractions ranged from 0·50 to 1·50 % and from 7·75 to 11·80 %, respectively. Possible correlations with energy and other nutrient intakes were also evaluated. Adherence of the meals to the Mediterranean dietary patterns was tested, and these findings reveal that a balanced and varied diet based on a Mediterranean-style diet plan provides adequate levels and bioaccessibility of Cr and Fe for young women, which is especially important to avoid mineral deficiencies.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Dr C. Cabrera-Vique, fax +34 958249577, email carmenc@ugr.es

References

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Keywords

Chromium and iron content in duplicate meals at a university residence: daily intake and dialysability

  • Carmen Cabrera-Vique (a1) and Marta Mesías (a1)

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