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Ultraprocessed beverages and processed meats increase the incidence of hypertension in Mexican women

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 November 2020

Adriana Monge
Affiliation:
Center for Research on Population Health, National Institute of Public Health, 62100, Cuernavaca, Mexico
Daniela Silva Canella
Affiliation:
Department of Applied Nutrition, Institute of Nutrition, Rio de Janeiro State University, Rio de Janeiro, 20550-900, Brazil
Nancy López-Olmedo
Affiliation:
Center for Research on Population Health, National Institute of Public Health, 62100, Cuernavaca, Mexico
Martín Lajous
Affiliation:
Center for Research on Population Health, National Institute of Public Health, 62100, Cuernavaca, Mexico Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
Adrian Cortés-Valencia
Affiliation:
Center for Research on Population Health, National Institute of Public Health, 62100, Cuernavaca, Mexico
Dalia Stern
Affiliation:
CONACyT-Center for Research on Population Health, National Institute of Public Health, 62100, Cuernavaca, Mexico
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Higher intake of ultraprocessed foods (UPF), which have undergone multiple processes and have poor nutrient quality, is associated with higher incidence of non-communicable diseases. Yet, its association with hypertension has scarcely been studied, especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). We aimed to estimate the associations between consumption of UPF (total, liquid and solid) and UPF subgroups and incident hypertension in a prospective cohort study. We used data from the Mexican Teachers’ Cohort including 64 934 disease-free women aged ≥25 years at baseline. We assessed baseline usual dietary intake using a validated FFQ, and each item was categorised according to NOVA, a degree of food processing classification system. UPF and UPF subgroups were categorised according to the distribution of their contribution to total energy intake. Hypertension was self-reported. We estimated incidence rate ratios (IRR) and their 95 % CI. During a median follow-up of 2·2 years, we identified 3752 incident cases of hypertension. Mean contribution of UPF to total energy intake was 29·8 (SD 9·4) % energy (23·4 (SD 8·9) % solid, 6·4 (SD 4·8) % liquid). Comparing extreme categories showed that higher total and solid UPF consumptions were not associated with incident hypertension (IRR 0·96, 95 % CI 0·79, 1·16; IRR 0·91, 95 % CI 0·82, 1·01, respectively). However, liquid UPF and processed meats were associated with increased hypertension (IRR 1·32, 95 % CI 1·10, 1·65; IRR 1·17, 95 % CI 1·01, 1·36, respectively). Addressing intake of liquid UPF and processed meats may help in managing hypertension in LMIC.

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Full Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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