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The characteristics of glucose homoeostasis in grass carp and Chinese longsnout catfish after oral starch administration: a comparative study between herbivorous and carnivorous species of fish

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 December 2019

Jingzhi Su
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430072, People’s Republic of China University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, People’s Republic of China
Yulong Gong
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430072, People’s Republic of China University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, People’s Republic of China
Lingyu Mei
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430072, People’s Republic of China University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, People’s Republic of China
Longwei Xi
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430072, People’s Republic of China University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, People’s Republic of China
Shuyan Chi
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Aquatic Animal Nutrition and Feed, Fisheries College, Guangdong Ocean University, Zhanjiang, Guangdong 524088, People’s Republic of China Southern Marine Science and Engineering Guangdong Laboratory, Zhanjiang, Guangdong 524088, People’s Republic of China
Yunxia Yang
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430072, People’s Republic of China
Junyan Jin
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430072, People’s Republic of China
Haokun Liu
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430072, People’s Republic of China
Xiaoming Zhu
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430072, People’s Republic of China
Shouqi Xie
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430072, People’s Republic of China
Dong Han
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430072, People’s Republic of China Hubei Engineering Research Center for Aquatic Animal Nutrition and Feed, Wuhan, Hubei 430072, People’s Republic of China
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Abstract

An oral starch administration trial was used to evaluate glucose homoeostasis in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) and Chinese longsnout catfish (Leiocassis longirostris Günther). Fish were administered with 3 g of a water and starch mixture (with 3:2 ratio) per 100 g body weight after fasting for 48 h. Fish were sampled at 0, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after oral starch administration. In grass carp, plasma levels of glucose peaked at 3 h but returned to baseline at 6 h. However, in Chinese longsnout catfish, plasma glucose levels peaked at 6 h and returned to baseline at 48 h. The activity of intestinal amylase was increased in grass carp at 1 and 3 h, but no significant change in Chinese longsnout catfish was observed. The activity of hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase fell significantly in grass carp but change was not evident in Chinese longsnout catfish. The expression levels and enzymic activity of hepatic pyruvate kinase increased in grass carp, but no significant changes were observed in the Chinese longsnout catfish. Glycogen synthase (gys) and glycogen phosphorylase (gp) were induced in grass carp. However, there was no significant change in gys and a clear down-regulation of gp in Chinese longsnout catfish. In brief, compared with Chinese longsnout catfish, grass carp exhibited a rapid increase and faster clearance rate of plasma glucose. This effect was closely related to significantly enhanced levels of digestion, glycolysis, glycogen metabolism and glucose-induced lipogenesis in grass carp, as well as the inhibition of gluconeogenesis.

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© The Authors 2019

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The characteristics of glucose homoeostasis in grass carp and Chinese longsnout catfish after oral starch administration: a comparative study between herbivorous and carnivorous species of fish
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