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To Rule a Ferocious Province: Roman Policy and the Aftermath of the Boudican Revolt

  • Gil Gambash (a1)

Abstract

Official Roman action in the aftermath of the Boudican revolt is shown in this article to reveal a strong, persistent intention to allay local anger. Under consideration are such aspects as the Roman policy of official appointments in the region, the deployment of military forces, and the commemoration of the victory over the rebel forces. The conclusion reached takes issue with the widely prevailing view that Roman governance based itself mostly on oppressive measures.

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To Rule a Ferocious Province: Roman Policy and the Aftermath of the Boudican Revolt

  • Gil Gambash (a1)

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