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Bisphosphonates and metastasis

  • J. Lester (a1) and R. Coleman (a1)

Abstract

Bone metastases frequently occur in advanced breast cancer patients and once incorporated into bone have profound effects on bone physiology. Bisphosphonates are potent inhibitors of osteoclastic function and are becoming increasingly important for the management of patients with breast cancer. They affect the ability of cancer cells to accelerate bone turnover and as a result control pain and reduce the risk of pathological fracture.

Furthermore ongoing clinical trials are investigating the role of bisphosphonates as an adjuvant therapy in high-risk breast cancer patients with an aim to prevent bone metastasis.

This article reviews the mechanisms of bone metastasis and will discuss present and future developments for the monitoring and treatment of metastatic bone disease.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence to: Prof. Robert Coleman, MD, FRCP, Academic Unit of Clinical Oncology, Cancer Research Centre, Weston Park Hospital, Sheffield S10 2SJ, UK. E-mail: R.E.Coleman@sheffield.ac.uk

References

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Keywords

Bisphosphonates and metastasis

  • J. Lester (a1) and R. Coleman (a1)

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