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The Aphasia Action, Success, and Knowledge Programme: Results from an Australian Phase I Trial of a Speech-Pathology-Led Intervention for People with Aphasia Early Post Stroke

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 March 2017

Brooke Ryan*
Affiliation:
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Kyla Hudson
Affiliation:
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Linda Worrall
Affiliation:
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Nina Simmons-Mackie
Affiliation:
Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA, USA
Emma Thomas
Affiliation:
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Emma Finch
Affiliation:
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia Centre for Functioning and Health Research (CFAHR), Metro South Hospital and Health Service, Queensland, Australia
Kathy Clark
Affiliation:
Speech Pathology Department, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Queensland Health, Brisbane, Australia
Jennifer Lethlean
Affiliation:
Speech Pathology Department, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Queensland Health, Brisbane, Australia
*
Address for correspondence: Dr Brooke Ryan, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, 4072, Queensland, Australia. E-mail: brooke.ryan@uq.edu.au

Abstract

Background: Speech pathologists work to optimise communication and reduce the emotional and social impact of communication disability in patients with aphasia but need evidence-based interventions to effectively do so.

Objective: This phase 1 study aims to evaluate an Australian speech-pathology-led intervention called the Aphasia Action, Success, and Knowledge (Aphasia ASK) programme for patients with aphasia early post stroke.

Methods: A convergent parallel mixed-methods design was utilised. The intervention included up to six individual face-to-face sessions with seven participants with aphasia and their nominated family member(s). Quantitative outcomes assessing mood, quality of life, and communication confidence were conducted for the participants with aphasia. Follow-up interviews were conducted with both participants with aphasia and family members to determine their perceptions of the programme.

Results: Significant improvements were found in communication confidence and mood after treatment and the gains were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Participants with aphasia and their family members reported a good level of satisfaction with the programme.

Conclusions: Findings suggest the Aphasia ASK programme is a suitable intervention with positive initial outcomes for people with aphasia. A larger scale evaluation with a greater variety of participants is now required. An Australian cluster randomised control trial is planned.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Australasian Society for the Study of Brain Impairment 2017 

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