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Psychological screening of adults and young people following the Manchester Arena incident

  • Paul French (a1), Alan Barrett (a2), Kate Allsopp (a3), Richard Williams (a4), Chris R. Brewin (a5), Daniel Hind (a6), Rebecca Sutton (a7), John Stancombe (a8) and Prathiba Chitsabesan (a9)...

Abstract

Background

Terrorist attacks have increased globally since the late 1990s with clear evidence of psychological distress across both adults and children and young people (CYP). After the Manchester Arena terrorist attack, the Resilience Hub was established to identify people in need of psychological and psychosocial support.

Aims

To examine the severity of symptoms and impact of the programme.

Method

The hub offers outreach, screening, clinical telephone triage and facilitation to access evidenced treatments. People were screened for trauma, depression, generalised anxiety and functioning who registered at 3, 6 and 9 months post-incident. Baseline scores were compared between screening groups (first screen at 3, 6 or 9 months) in each cohort (adult, CYP), and within groups to compare scores at 9 months.

Results

There were significant differences in adults' baseline scores across screening groups on trauma, depression, anxiety and functioning. There were significant differences in the baseline scores of CYP across screening groups on trauma, depression, generalised anxiety and separation anxiety. Paired samples t-tests demonstrated significant differences between baseline and follow-up scores on all measures for adults in the 3-month screening group, and only depression and functioning measures for adults in the 6-month screening group. Data about CYP in the 3-month screening group, demonstrated significant differences between baseline and follow-up scores on trauma, generalised anxiety and separation anxiety.

Conclusions

These findings suggest people who register earlier are less symptomatic and demonstrate greater improvement across a range of psychological measures. Further longitudinal research is necessary to understand changes over time.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

Corresponding author

Correspondence: Paul French, Faculty of Health, Psychology and Social Care, 53 Bonsall St, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M15 6GX, UK. Email: p.french@mmu.ac.uk

References

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Keywords

Psychological screening of adults and young people following the Manchester Arena incident

  • Paul French (a1), Alan Barrett (a2), Kate Allsopp (a3), Richard Williams (a4), Chris R. Brewin (a5), Daniel Hind (a6), Rebecca Sutton (a7), John Stancombe (a8) and Prathiba Chitsabesan (a9)...

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Psychological screening of adults and young people following the Manchester Arena incident

  • Paul French (a1), Alan Barrett (a2), Kate Allsopp (a3), Richard Williams (a4), Chris R. Brewin (a5), Daniel Hind (a6), Rebecca Sutton (a7), John Stancombe (a8) and Prathiba Chitsabesan (a9)...
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