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The effect of second-generation antipsychotics on hippocampal volume in first episode of psychosis: longitudinal study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Michael Bodnar*
Affiliation:
Prevention and Early Intervention Program for Psychoses (PEPP – Montreal), Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Canada Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
Ashok K. Malla
Affiliation:
Prevention and Early Intervention Program for Psychoses (PEPP – Montreal), Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Canada Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
Carolina Makowski
Affiliation:
Integrated Program in Neuroscience, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
M. Mallar Chakravarty
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Canada Integrated Program in Neuroscience, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
Ridha Joober
Affiliation:
Prevention and Early Intervention Program for Psychoses (PEPP – Montreal), Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Canada Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
Martin Lepage
Affiliation:
Prevention and Early Intervention Program for Psychoses (PEPP – Montreal), Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Canada Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada Integrated Program in Neuroscience, McGill University, Montreal, Canada Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
*
Martin Lepage, PhD, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Frank B. Common Pavilion, F1143, 6875 LaSalle Blvd., Verdun, Quebec H4H 1R3, Canada. Email: martin.lepage@mcgill.ca
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Abstract

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Background

Current neuroscience literature has related treatment with aripiprazole to improved memory performance and subcellular changes in the hippocampus.

Aims

To explore the volumetric changes in hippocampal grey matter in people with a first episode of psychosis (FEP) treated with second-generation antipsychotics.

Method

Baseline and 1-year follow-up magnetic resonance images were obtained. Hippocampal volumes were estimated by using FreeSurfer and MAGeT-Brain. Subgroups included: aripiprazole (n=13), olanzapine (n=12), risperidone/paliperidone (n=24), refused-antipsychotics (n=13) and controls (n=44).

Results

Aripiprazole subgroup displayed significant increases in bilateral hippocampal volume compared with all other subgroups (FreeSurfer: all P's<0.012; MAGeT-Brain: all P's<0.040).

Conclusions

Aripiprazole is a first-line, second-generation treatment option that may provide an added benefit of pro-hippocampal growth. The biological underpinnings of these changes should be the focus of future investigations and may be key towards achieving a better clinical outcome for more individuals.

Type
Research Article
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
Copyright
Copyright © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016

Footnotes

Declaration of interest

M.L. received financial assistance/compensation for research and educational events from Janssen-Ortho, Eli Lilly, Roche and Otsuka/Lundbeck Alliance. A.K.M. received financial assistance/compensation for research and educational activities from Pfizer, Janssen-Ortho, AstraZeneca and Bristol-Myers Squibb. R.J. received consultancy honorariums from Pfizer and Janssen-Ortho.

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